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Chinese mushroom found to have powerful anti-aging benefits

Posted: November 7, 2010 at 9:22 am


The cordyceps mushroom is back in the spotlight again, except this time for its anti-aging properties. Researchers from Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc., and LifeGen Technologies have found that Cordyceps sinensis (Cs-4), a traditional Chinese mushroom, is a powerful anti-aging food with the ability to improve energy metabolism, decrease fatigue, bolster endurance levels and lengthen lifespan.

Back in March, we covered breakthrough research on the power of cordyceps to treat cancer (http://www.dreddyclinic.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=22848,http://www.dreddyclinic.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=22276), but the new research has found even more beneficial uses for this emerging superfood. By encouraging human genes to express in ways that promote longevity, cordyceps has incredible potential in helping to reverse the negative effects of aging.

"We're making great breakthroughs in gene expression science that have application in the fields of health and longevity," explained Joe Chang, Ph.D., chief scientific officer and executive vice president of development at Nu Skin. "These studies ... help validate the critical role gene expression modulation plays in the aging process. We believe that the future of anti-aging is in developing consumer solutions that support youthful gene expression." Read more...

Youtharia for Anti-Aging & Longevity

Western medicine teams up..

Posted: at 9:22 am


This LA Times article will let you see where Integrative Medicine may be taken over by major medical centers. There are some important observations made by this Times Staff Writer that can help you differentiate for your clients what you offer them from what these centers are doing.

The concerns voiced about appearing unscientific etc. by a cancer patient here is important to appreciate. Please understand that in my view, no one is fully offering adequate Vitamin C based programs to their patients. The books written can provide your patient with scientific information that will help most begin to deal with their problem of ill health, which virtually always needs to be a multifactorial approach. They can start with Irwin Stone's Vitamin C The Healing Factor, which anyone can obtain free of charge from following the links on Wikipedia after you search on Vitamin C, to newer books like Dr Levy and Dr Hickey have written or the audiotape by Dr Riordan. Read more...

More information's about detox diets

Carla wants to know

Posted: at 9:22 am


In response to a question posed by one of my oldest and most perceptive friends, I posted what follows to my Facebook profile.

Her question was posed after watching this video http://vimeo.com/15979195

"Rocky, am I really ignorant and paranoid?

It seems like this technology holds they key to either really, really good stuff for us as a species, or it has the potential for really really bad stuff.

I trust the science and the scientists. I don't trust the Money that controls what's done with the science.

Einstein was a really nice guy. He had no idea his science would be used for war. I don't think any of the Manhattan Project scientists went into it knowing what they were unleashing on the world."

~ Carla Conrad

My answer: A most perspicacious observation, and right on the mark. Occam’s Razor, 21st century style, meaning that you have hit upon the simplest explanation for the potential outcome; like every technological innovation in the past, nanoscale technologies have both the potential for tremendous good and/or tremendous bad. And don’t let my seemingly cavalier use of "tremendous" lull you into a false sense of security; I mean "tremendous" as in "things that have the potential to change everything we think we know about ourselves, while enabling each of us with the power to effect and experience our surroundings in ways heretofore only imagined."

I have been actively and intensely following nanoscale technologies since the early ‘90’s. At the end of the day, my most prescient observation would be that these technologies will have an impact on our global society many times greater than ALL past technological revolutions. Let me put it another way: nanoscale technologies - and the products thereof - will enable far greater change than our discovery, development and use of fire, bronze, iron, steel, electrical power, cars, planes and space travel put together.

Any person, institution or government entity that says "Oh yeah, nanotechnology, we got that handled" is lying their ass off. Equally, any person, institution or government entity that says "Oh yeah, nanotechnology, it’s gonna kill us all in one or more horrible ways" is also lying their ass off. Anyone that fervent usually has a hidden agenda, and one which serves a higher master. You’ll notice I said "usually" – many of my colleagues in the nanospace are humanitarians in the best sense and are talking about and planning for ways in which the good things can be emphasized and the bad minimized or eliminated.

My philosophy is summed up thus:

Nanotechnology will certainly play a pivotal role in our future; now, with the introduction of lighter/stronger materials in the auto, space, and military industries, and later, with the introduction of molecular manufacturing (making items per your specifications, in your own home, for pennies on the dollar of current prices – think "replicator" and you will not be too far off).

Expect to see revolutionary changes in solar, fuel cell and hydrogen storage technologies within the next few years. And expect to see a great deal of interest in and subsequent higher funding of nanotech-enabled sensor technologies for military, homeland security and civilian applications within the next few years. Put another (albeit obvious) way: expect to see cultural tsunamis of a magnitude that rival anything we have thus far experienced.

No informed person doubts that developments at the nanoscale will be significant. We debate the time frame, the magnitude and the possibilities, but not the likelihood for large-scale change. The least-speculative views suggest that we're in for changes of an order that justifies – if not demands – our undivided attention. Will we be ready? (BTW: not kidding, not even the weensiest amount)

OK, off my high horse and back to your previously programmed station…

Bacteria, the anti-cancer soldier

Posted: at 9:22 am


Everyone knows about cancer. According to the World Health Organization eight million people died of one of the many forms of cancer 2007 and this number is expected to grow to more than 12 million by 2030. However, unlike many other significant diseases, cancer is not confined to a continent or socioeconomic cohort. Also unlike other entrants on the WHO’s top 10 there is no vaccine or wonder drug. This insidious disease requires surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy all of which wreak havoc on the patient during and often long after treatment. But recently novel research looking at using certain bacteria as a therapy is gaining traction that may result in new treatment options that are cheap, easy to produce, noninvasive and if the current research is any indication capable of complete remission in some cases.

[More]

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TEDMED 2010: Technology and the people

Posted: at 9:22 am


SAN DIEGO-- On day two of TEDMED , running between Oct. 27 and 30, three themes stood out: the difference between children and adults for therapies; the connection between animals, people and disease; and how genetics will shape health care.

Frances Jensen of Harvard University and Children’s Hospital Boston explained the dramatic differences between developing and adult brains. With faster synapses, teens learn faster than adults, for instance. But as a consequence, they also "get addicted faster, longer and stronger than adults do," she said. Because teens have more synaptic material to affect, they suffer greater brain damage from alcohol than in adults. Differences in developing brain mean should have "no more hand-me-down drugs" for youths, added Jensen.

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Clear New Insights into the Genetics of Depression

Posted: at 9:22 am


The psychologist Rollo May once described depression as “the inability to construct a future”. [More]

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Optogenetics: Controlling the Brain with Light [Extended Version]

Posted: at 9:22 am


Despite the enormous efforts of clinicians and researchers, our limited insight into psychiatric disease (the worldwide-leading cause of years of life lost to death or disability) hinders the search for cures and contributes to stigmatization. Clearly, we need new answers in psychiatry. But as philosopher of science Karl Popper might have said, before we can find the answers, we need the power to ask new questions. In other words, we need new technology. [More]

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Controlling the Brain with Light (preview)

Posted: at 9:22 am


Every day as a practicing psychiatrist, I confront my field’s limitations. Despite the noble efforts of clinicians and researchers, our limited insight into the roots of psychiatric disease hinders the search for cures and contributes to the stigmatization of this enormous problem, the leading cause worldwide of years lost to death or disability. Clearly, we need new answers in psychiatry. But as philosopher of science Karl Popper might have said, before we can find the answers, we need the power to ask new questions. In other words, we need new technology.

Developing appropriate techniques is difficult, however, because the mammalian brain is beyond compare in its complexity. It is an intricate system in which tens of billions of intertwined neurons--with multitudinous distinct characteristics and wiring patterns--exchange precisely timed, millisecond-scale electrical signals and a rich diversity of biochemical messengers. Because of that complexity, neuroscientists lack a deep grasp of what the brain is really doing--of how specific activity patterns within specific brain cells ultimately give rise to thoughts, memories, sensations and feelings. By extension, we also do not know how the brain’s physical failures produce distinct psychiatric disorders such as depression or schizophrenia. The ruling paradigm of psychiatric disorders--casting them in terms of chemical imbalances and altered levels of neurotransmitters--does not do justice to the brain’s high-speed electrical neural circuitry. Psychiatric treatments are thus essentially serendipitous: helpful for many but rarely illuminating.

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Revolution Postponed: Why the Human Genome Project Has Been Disappointing (preview)

Posted: at 9:22 am


A decade ago biologists and nonbiologists alike gushed with optimism about the medical promise of the $3-billion Human Genome Project. In announcing the first rough draft of the human “book of life” at a White House ceremony in the summer of 2000, President Bill Clinton predicted that the genome project would “revolutionize the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of most, if not all, human diseases.”

A year earlier Francis S. Collins, then head of the National Human Genome Research Institute and perhaps the project’s most tireless enthusiast, painted a grand vision of the “personalized medicine” likely to emerge from the project by the year 2010: genetic tests indicating a person’s risk for heart disease, cancer and other common maladies would be available, soon to be followed by preventives and therapies tailored to the individual.

[More]

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Indian Healthcare IT market & Oracle’s presence in Indian Healthcare

Posted: at 9:22 am


Dr. Mehdi Khalid Vice President, Healthcare and Life Sciences Industry Business Unit Asia Paci?c and Japan at Oracle about key aspects of healthcare IT market in India & Oracle’s presence in this space.

DownloadHealth India 2010

India announce Heart Surgery for $1000 USD

Posted: at 9:22 am


Launched by British Prime Minister David Cameron on 28 July 2010 in Bangalore, India, Dishaa is an initiative that will expand, enrich and energise relations between India and the UK.

Dishaa means direction in India’s national language Hindi. And that what the it is aiming for direction for for future leaders from India and UK

Dishaa has announced the new challenge for the millenia will be

Heart surgery at $1,000 (USD) – what has to change in how society operates and innovates to make this a reality?

Dr Devi Shetty of  Narayana Hrudayalaya a large hospital group specializing in Cardiac Surgery from Bangalore, India says  it is on the way to become a reality

And he is going ahead with the plan to open India’s first low-cost hospital for caridac surgery will be up and running in Mysore  by early next year, to offer Cardiac Surgery at $1500 USD against the current cost of  $5000 USD in India

These state-of-the art hospitals will be built at a cost of  just $ 35 Million USD, about one-fifth the cost of constructing a 300-bed super-speciality hospital in India.  By 2012 Dr. Shetty plan to open 50 more such hospitals in India. the next are coming up in Siliguri (West Bengal) and Bhubaneswar (Orissa) with help from  The Union health ministry of India

Details on Dishaa page

http://www.commonpurpose.org/info/media-releases/101021_$1,000-(usd)-for-heart-surgery

Insurance coverage for healthcare IT software, to protect healthcare IT companies from damages inflicted by their software

Posted: at 9:22 am


Ah. well they should be protected, with the number of physicians unhappy with the Healthcare IT systems rising. We ll thank goodness patients will also get third party coverage if the software errs.

Chubb Group of Insurance Companies has established the “Healthcare Information Technology” liability insurance to protect Healthcare IT companies.

Over 1,000 companies supply information technology products and services to the healthcare and medical research industries in the US and Canada would be happy to hear that

An integrated liability solution from Chubb can help protect healthcare information technology companies from:

  • general and products liability when software or hardware that is defective or contains inaccurate or incomplete information causes or contributes to patient injuries;
  • errors and omission liability when a product defect or service deficiency results in economic injury to a customer;
  • third-party liability to patients, healthcare providers and others associated with database security breaches; and
  • costs incurred to comply with state, federal

Chubb is targeting Healthcare Information Technology Companies providing any of the following services

  • Electronic health record system providers
  • Clinical decision support system providers
  • Telehealth and health information exchanges
  • Practice management system providers
  • Payor system providers
  • Drug discovery firms
  • Clinical informatics firms
  • Healthcare systems consulting firms

 

70% of Pharmaceutical organisations outsource at least one PV activity. This level is expected to increase to 80% by 2012

Posted: at 9:22 am


Currently, 70% of Pharmaceutical organisations outsource at least one PV activity. This level is expected to increase to 80% by 2012.

Heightened Interest from the Medical Research Community and New Funding of International Stem Cell Corporation’s (ISCO) Therapeutic Research

Posted: at 9:22 am


International Stem Cell Corporation (OTCBB: ISCO), http://www.internationalstemcell.com, announced today that the recent presentation entitled "Hepatocyte-like cells derived from patient-specific human parthenogenetic stem cells possess functions of mature human hepatocytes including P450 activity" has been identified as an "AASLD Presidential Poster of Distinction" in the Stem Cells session of The Liver Meeting, the 61st Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), in Boston, MA, one of the most prestigious annual medical and scientific conferences. The abstract of the presentation is published in the peer-reviewed supplement to Hepatology, volume 52, number 4 (SUPPL), Oct. 2010, pg 965A, the official journal of the AASLD.

ISCO's CEO Andrey Semechkin, Ph.D., said, "For our cell biologists to have received this award from the leading society in the U.S. focused on treating liver diseases, demonstrates the high caliber of research being carried out at ISCO, and that human parthenogenetic stem cells and their differentiated derivatives are becoming of greater interest to the medical research community as a potential source of therapeutically valuable cells."

ISCO also announced today the initiation of the first in a series of animal studies designed to demonstrate whether hepatocytes and their progenitors derived from the human parthenogenetic stem cells show any disease modifying activity in vivo.

Dr. Nikolay Turovets, ISCO's Director of Research and Therapeutic Development said, "ISCO's continued focus on therapeutic development is critical to show that hepatocytes derived from stem cells can reproduce missing liver function in a diseased organism. Our first series of experiments are designed to test the ability of our cells to engraft and survive in vivo. A second set of experiments will investigate the functional activity of successfully engrafted cells. Data from these studies will also be used to guide the development of future IND submissions."

In other research news, ISCO announced that a grant in which ISCO is a partner, was recently funded by the Qualified Therapeutic Discovery Project Grants Program created under the healthcare reform legislation enacted last March. The study is led by Paul H. Chen, M.D. to investigate healing after corneal surgery using ISCO's corneal epithelial cells developed by ISCO's wholly-owned subsidiary Lifeline Cell Technology. ISCO's cells, combined with a proprietary surgical device developed by Dr. Chen, may provide safer and better long term results than LASIK. By utilizing ISCO's human corneal cells, ISCO and Dr. Chen believe that cellular enhanced PRK could eventually replace LASIK for many of the hundreds of thousands of patients who require corrective eye surgery.

According to Dr. Chen, "This collaborative work with ISCO could lead to a safer and more effective treatment that hopefully will provide quicker visual recovery, less pain, and an improved refractive correction outcome."

ABOUT INTERNATIONAL STEM CELL CORPORATION (ISCO.OB)

International Stem Cell Corporation is a California-based biotechnology company focused on therapeutic and research products. ISCO's core technology, parthenogenesis, results in creation of pluripotent human stem cells from unfertilized oocytes (eggs). These proprietary cells avoid ethical issues associated with use or destruction of viable human embryos and, unlike most other major stem cell types, can be immune matched and be a source of therapeutic cells with minimal rejection after transplantation into hundreds of millions of individuals of differing racial groups. ISCO also produces and markets specialized cells and growth media for therapeutic research worldwide through its subsidiary, Lifeline Cell Technology, and is developing a line of cosmeceutical products via its subsidiary, Lifeline Skin Care. ISCO is advancing novel human stem cell-based therapies where cells have been proven to be efficacious but traditional small molecule and protein therapeutics have not. More information is available on ISCO's website, http://www.internationalstemcell.com.

To subscribe to receive ongoing corporate communications please click on the following link: http://www.b2i.us/irpass.asp?BzID=1468&to=ea&s=0.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Statements pertaining to anticipated developments and therapeutic applications, the potential benefits of collaborations, affiliations, and other opportunities for the company and its subsidiaries, along with other statements about the future expectations, beliefs, goals, plans, or prospects expressed by management constitute forward-looking statements. Any statements that are not historical fact (including, but not limited to statements that contain words such as" could", "will," "believes," "plans," "anticipates," "expects," "estimates,") should also be considered to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, risks inherent in the development and/or commercialization of potential products and the management of collaborations, uncertainty in the results of clinical trials or regulatory approvals, need and ability to obtain future capital, application of capital resources among competing uses, and maintenance of intellectual property rights. Actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in these forward-looking statements and as such should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect the company's business, particularly those mentioned in the cautionary statements found in the company's Securities and Exchange Commission filings. The company disclaims any intent or obligation to update forward-looking statements.

Key Words: Stem cells, parthenogenesis, biotechnology, hepatocytes, liver disease

International Stem Cell Corporation
Jeffrey D. Janus
Sr. Vice President, Operations
1-760-940-6383
jjanus@intlstemcell.com
or
Nikolay Turovets, Ph.D.
Director of Research and Therapeutic Development
nturovets@intlstemcell.com

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