About Us



Page 11234..»




Vancouver Acupuncture Testimonial-1: Soul Natural Holistic Medicine

Posted: June 30, 2011 at 2:29 pm


This video is about Mr. Chen's Testimonial.

See original here:

Vancouver Acupuncture Testimonial-1: Soul Natural Holistic Medicine

Video Game Health Care Bill

Posted: June 29, 2011 at 7:14 am


See our videos a month earlier at http://www.collegehumor.com and follow us on http

Continue reading here:

Video Game Health Care Bill

Optimum Nutrition Serious Mass Supplement Review

Posted: June 28, 2011 at 11:01 am


TO SEE OUR RECOMMENDED SUPPLEMENTS VISIT http://www.2buildmusclefast.com more muscle building tips at http://www.2buildmusclefast.com INFORMATION ABOUT TWINMUSCLEWORKOUT WE ARE NATURAL BODYBUILDERS AND DO NOT USE STEROIDS OR PRO HORMONES.

See more here:

Optimum Nutrition Serious Mass Supplement Review

"Health Food" vs. Healthy Food — How to read labels

Posted: at 11:00 am


Do you know how to read food labels?

Read more:

"Health Food" vs. Healthy Food -- How to read labels

"HOT" ANTI-AGING S0LUTION

Posted: at 11:00 am


mhlnk.com Anti-Aging for Men and Women, click now

See more here:

"HOT" ANTI-AGING S0LUTION

Twinmuscleworkout Post Workout Nutrition

Posted: June 27, 2011 at 6:30 pm


TO SEE OUR RECOMMENDED SUPPLEMENTS VISIT http://www.2buildmusclefast.com For more muscle building tips http://www.2buildmusclefast.com WE ARE NATURAL BODYBUILDERS AND DO NOT USE STEROIDS OR PRO HORMONES.

Read more from the original source:

Twinmuscleworkout Post Workout Nutrition

Another Crowdsourced Research Funding Success for Longecity

Posted: June 26, 2011 at 3:58 pm


I'm pleased to see that the Immortality Institute / Longecity has completed fundraising for their latest project, an investigation of the potential benefits of microglia transplants in the aging brain:

After months of fundraising we are now delighted to announce that the project has started! Through many donations large and small, the community has raised sufficient funds to initiate the project. Last month, we passed the 80% mark and knew that full success would only be a matter of time. Then, something amazing happened: though promoting this effort, a far sighted investor has stepped forward who can see the potential in developing this research project. The angel [committed] a substantial contribution towards a research arm that is closely aligned to the project LongeCity is funding. Thus, we have achieved something amazing together: every dollar donated to this life extension research project has not only been doubled through internal funds but multiplied manifold! Few people, especially those with very limited personal means, who want to invest in life extension would find such effective opportunities to make a real difference.

Which is good news all round. I've mentioned this effort in past months, so you can head on back into the archives for more details on the funded research. We live in an age in which a large range of meaningful early-stage work in biotechnology can be performed for comparatively little money - a few tens of thousands of dollars, or less. A single young researcher with lab access can validate theories, determine whether a line of research has promise, or make new connections in a field - and all in a matter of a few months to half a year of work, as one of a number of ongoing projects.

Most importantly, the new reality of low costs means that people of everyday means can band together in small associations to fund the research that they find important, on a project by project basis. This sort of grassroots, bottom-up organization is greatly aided by the internet, but crowdsourced philanthropy for science in detail is only just in its infancy. Projects like those undertaken by the Immortality Institute volunteers are the first signs of the true future of research funding - a detailed and glorious patchwork in which everyone can pick and choose the exact projects they wish to fund, and in doing so learn more about the science behind the causes they support.

Another sign of progress in this direction is the creation of dedicated crowdsourced scientific philanthropy initiatives like FundScience, which has actually been around for a couple of years, and will be holding a meetup on July 15th in the Bay Area:

FundScience was formed to get the public invested in science. We aim to accomplish two goals:

1. Provide a way for scientists and researchers to self fund their research by crowd funding.

2. Bring people closer to science by providing an insight into research activities done across the globe.

In addition to staying in touch with scientific activity via FundScience.org , we are launching monthly meetups to give you an opportunity to get to know your favorite researchers in person. Come find out how you can be a part of their amazing work.

I co-founded FundScience a few years ago with the hope of getting the public invested in science. We had two goals when we began. The first was to get much needed funding and guidance to young researchers. The other was to get non-scientists to interact with researchers and understand the research process. Our first round of projects was selected and posted on the site late last year. In keeping with our goal of bringing science to the masses we've decided to complement our online presence with a monthly meetup were we can get researchers to discuss their advancements and get non-scientists to come and ask questions, interact and fund some projects.

There are a fair number of philanthropic ventures that help funnel dollars from many donors to worthy causes, such as Philanthroper for example, but still very few ventures that take the next step of breaking things down into fine-grained projects. Much of the wall between the broader charitable public and the details of the work they support is, I feel, unnecessary. The faster it evaporates the better off we'll all be.

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Posted: at 3:58 pm


Type 2 diabetes is as close to a disease of choice as you're likely to find: provided that you adopt a sensible lifestyle of good diet and exercise then you are never going to suffer the condition, barring extremely bad luck in your genes. Similarly, if you are headed down the path towards diabetes, you can turn back by changing the way you live your life. Here's evidence that the turn can be made quite late if made aggressively enough: "An extreme eight-week diet of 600 calories a day can reverse Type 2 diabetes in people newly diagnosed with the disease .... the low-calorie diet reduced fat levels in the pancreas and liver, which helped insulin production return to normal. Seven out of 11 people studied were free of diabetes three months later. ... More research is needed to see whether the reversal is permanent, say experts. ... The 11 participants in the study were all diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the previous four years. They cut their food intake drastically for two months, eating only liquid diet drinks and non-starchy vegetables. ... After one week of the diet, researchers found that the pre-breakfast blood sugar levels of all participants had returned to normal. MRI scans of their pancreases also revealed that the fat levels in the organ had decreased from around 8% - an elevated level - to a more normal 6%. Three months after the end of the diet, when participants had returned to eating normally and received advice on healthy eating and portion size, most no longer suffered from the condition. ... This diet was only used to test the hypothesis that if people lose substantial weight they will lose their diabetes. Although this study involved people diagnosed with diabetes within the last four years, there is potential for people with longer-standing diabetes to turn things around too."

Link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13887909

Meiosis and Longevity in Yeast

Posted: at 3:58 pm


Lower forms of life have stages that don't exist in higher animals - such as meiosis in yeast, or the dauer stage in nematodes. Researchers have found they can manipulate longevity by manipulating the molecular machinery associated with these states, but it's generally felt that this is of lesser relevance to mammals. Here is an example of the type: "Human cells have a finite lifespan: They can only divide a certain number of times before they die. However, that lifespan is reset when reproductive cells are formed, which is why the children of a 20-year-old man have the same life expectancy as those of an 80-year-old man. How that resetting occurs in human cells is not known, but MIT biologists have now found a gene that appears to control this process in yeast. Furthermore, by turning on that gene in aged yeast cells, they were able to double their usual lifespan. ... When yeast cells reproduce, they undergo a special type of cell division called meiosis, which produces spores. The MIT team found that the signs of cellular aging disappear at the very end of meiosis. ... The researchers discovered that a gene called NDT80 is activated at the same time that the rejuvenation occurs. When they turned on this gene in aged cells that were not reproducing, the cells lived twice as long as normal. ... In aged cells with activated NDT80, the nucleolar damage was the only age-related change that disappeared. That suggests that nucleolar changes are the primary force behind the aging process." Which is an interesting conclusion, but given all the other evidence for mechanisms of aging in mammals, I'm not sure it's going to translate well into higher animals.

Link: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/cell-aging-0624.html

On Deathism and Hope

Posted: at 3:58 pm


I stumbled across an interesting post on life, death, and cryonics today:

A deathist is someone who tells you death is good, natural, and somehow right. If you can truly trick yourself into thinking they're correct then good luck with your funerary planning. I, for one, disagree.

...

Humans have made tremendous advances over the past twenty years. And unless you believe all progress will stop, as if nothing new can be learned, then chances are good cryonics will increasingly be a short term means to heal and repair damage instead of the long-term suspension it is today. What cryonics does is provide the time to find causes and treatments. It is a chance to continue your life. To extend your life. To improve your quality of life.

If it doesn't work you're no more dead than if you did nothing. But some chance is better than no chance. [So] don't dispair. Don't give up. Never allow anyone to bury you so they feel better. You won't be there to care. You will be forgotten.

Name any random non-famous soldier from a past war who was told they would be remembered. How many grave markers in Arlington stand in quiet solitude because no one remembers, is alive, or cares to visit? How many of these lonely markers exist in local cemeteries? Name anyone you don't know via blood, friendship, or fame who has died in the past 50 years. Chances are good you can't. We lie to ourselves and each other to feel better when what we should do is work toward never having to lie in the first place.

Funerals and monuments are made by the living for the living. The world belongs the living, and the dead are slipped from it from the very moment of their demise. There are, as the author points out above, so very many ways in which we lie to and indulge ourselves in relation to the deaths of those we know and those we never knew - and none of it helps one bit when it comes to making things better for the future.

Death, the suffering that leads up to it, and the material loss left in its wake, are horrors that we should be working harder to eliminate. We know that it is possible to build rejuvenation biotechnologies, and we know in some detail how to do it. We know that is is possible to preserve the fine structure of the brain sufficiently well to preserve the mind, and possible to do just that for near every dying person. These things are well within the laws of physics as we understand them, and economically viable projects - yet very, very few people in this world of ours are working to make these visions a reality.

Eat Less, Live Longer?

Posted: at 3:58 pm


A cautious popular science article on calorie restriction: "Caloric restriction as a research discipline has actually been around for ages. The first demonstration of extending lifespan and improving health in rats by cutting calories was back in 1934, and since then the finding has been repeated in numerous species up to and including non-human primates. Animals subjected to caloric restriction while maintaining adequate vitamin, mineral, and protein intakes not only live longer, healthier lives, they also maintain vitality to an older age and have fewer visible signs of aging - such as white fur - compared to better-fed siblings. It is worth noting that we are not just talking about shedding a few pounds here. Animal studies show that, almost up to the point of frank starvation, the more calorie restriction the better when it comes to extending lifespan and health. ... Virtually every animal study ever done on caloric restriction has shown benefits for health and longevity, and now we have emerging studies showing that even intermittent caloric restriction may be beneficial, so it would be almost surprising if humans turned out to be the only species to have a negative response. Unlike research animals, however, humans don't live alone in pre-paid houses with the right kind of food carefully provided by scientists, so if caloric restriction is to be a feasible strategy for maintaining health as we age it has to be feasible to implement - in other words, doable and practical in real lives in the real world." People who write about calorie restriction without having made a serious attempt at trying it invariably exaggerate the difficulty. Practicing calorie restriction is both "doable and practical," and requires no more investment of time and willpower than any modestly challenging hobby.

Link: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2011/06/18/caloric-restriction-the-science-of-eating-less-and-living-longer.html

Notes on the 40th Annual Meeting of the American Aging Association

Posted: at 3:57 pm


From the IEET: "The focus of the 40th annual meeting of the American Aging Association, held a few weeks ago in North Carolina, was emerging concepts in the mechanisms of aging. Most of the usual topics in aging were covered, such as dietary restriction, inflammation, stress resistance, homeostasis and proteasome activity, sarcopenia, and neural degeneration. Newer methods like microRNAs and genome sequencing were employed to investigate gene expression variance with aging and genetic signatures of longevity. Aging as a field continues to mature including by using a systems approach to tracing conserved pathways across organisms, sharpening definitions of sarcopenia, frailty, and healthspan, and distinguishing interventions by age tier (early-onset versus late-onset). A pre-conference session on late-onset intervention concluded that there are numerous benefits to deriving such interventions."

Link: http://ieet.org/index.php/IEET/more/swan20110622

Towards DNA Methylation as a Biomarker of Age and Aging

Posted: at 3:57 pm


You have at least two ages: your chronological age, how long you have lived, and what we might call your biological age - which is a measure of how damaged you are. Aging, meaning the process of physical degeneration, is really just a matter of damage at the level of cells and molecular machinery. The more damage, the greater your biological age. If you are 56, you might have the damage load of the average 50 year old or the average 60 year old. Or worse, or better - and in either case that will reflect in your current health and remaining life span.

In actual fact, biological age is probably far more complex than this. There is every reason to expect different systems in your body to suffer different rates of damage accumultion. Consider the immune system in AIDS patients for example, which is prematurely aged into exhaustion and frailty. That is an extreme example of differential rates of damage: you would expect to find smaller differences in levels of accumulated damage in the biological components of a healthy person. But the differences are there.

Recognize that a lot of what I have said above is theory. Anyone who claims to be able to measure your biological age is largely blowing smoke: there's no standard for such a thing, and not much in the way of biomarkers of aging. Biomarkers are measurable aspects of our biology that can be scaled against age or remaining life expectancy - and so might be used to determine a subject's chronological age, or how much longer they might expect to live. The absence of good biomarkers poses a strategic challenge for the ongoing development of longevity science, because in order to efficiently evaluate a potential therapy to slow or reverse aging, researchers need to rapidly understand its actual effects on healthy life span. Sitting around and waiting is the only presently foolproof strategy, and that is one of the reasons that even mouse studies of longevity therapies are very expensive. No-one wants to run an experiment for going on four years if there is a way to call a halt after a few months and some biomarker measurements.

That difference in experimental run time represents a large sum of money in every sizable study, not to mention the opportunity cost in research that might otherwise move ahead, but must wait for years for results to arrive. Further, when you stop to consider human studies, you'll see that that the present state of affairs rules out a wide range of possible trials - "wait and see" isn't viable when the time frame is decades. This is why we should all be interested in progress towards the establishment of biomarkers for aging, and today I'll point you to recent work on DNA methylation, undertaken with that aim in mind. You might recall that DNA methylation correlates with age and age-related frailty, and here researchers greatly improve upon the precision of that correlation.

UCLA scientists accurately predict age with saliva sample:

Using saliva samples contributed by 34 pairs of identical male twins ages 21 to 55, UCLA researchers scoured the men's genomes and identified 88 sites on the DNA that strongly correlated methylation to age. They replicated their findings in a general population of 31 men and 29 women aged 18 to 70. ... Vilain and his team envision the test becoming a forensic tool in crime-scene investigations. By analyzing the traces of saliva left in a tooth bite or on a coffee cup, lab experts could narrow the age of a criminal suspect to a five-year range.

Epigenetic Predictor of Age:

From the moment of conception, we begin to age. A decay of cellular structures, gene regulation, and DNA sequence ages cells and organisms. DNA methylation patterns change with increasing age and contribute to age related disease. Here we identify 88 sites in or near 80 genes for which the degree of cytosine methylation is significantly correlated with age in saliva of 34 male identical twin pairs between 21 and 55 years of age. Furthermore, we validated sites in the promoters of three genes and replicated our results in a general population sample of 31 males and 29 females between 18 and 70 years of age. The methylation of three sites - in the promoters of the EDARADD, TOM1L1, and NPTX2 genes - is linear with age over a range of five decades. Using just two cytosines from these loci, we built a regression model that explained 73% of the variance in age, and is able to predict the age of an individual with an average accuracy of 5.2 years.

There are some subtleties here. DNA methylation occurs in different regions of DNA at different rates (and probably at different rates in the same region of DNA in cells in different locations in the body). The researchers here have found a statistical model based on methylation of a few specific genes in one portion of the body that is a biomarker of chronological age. For our purposes that is the less useful biomarker: we want one that measures remaining life expectancy, or in other words a biomarker that is effectively a measure of present levels of biological damage.

We know that methylation patterns correlate with age-related frailty. There is every reason to expect that researchers will soon be able to build a range of statistical measures based on DNA methylation that will predict remaining life expectancy across most common states of health and ages. The research described above gives further weight to that expectation.

More on Financial Planning and Cryonics

Posted: at 3:57 pm


It is good to see that cryonics is now sufficiently widely known that business magazines are willing to write articles on the financial engineering and legal explorations associated with establishing a successful cryopreservation: "Financial planning, like most disciplines, generally relies on the assumption that the dead will remain that way. Some people, however, are not as willing to accept this premise. Cryonicists believe science will eventually give us the ability to reanimate the dead. In preparation for this possibility, they elect to have their bodies, or sometimes merely their heads, stored in extreme low temperatures so that, when the time comes, they can be restored to life. Some anticipate a future in which their bodies will be thawed and cured of their ailments, while others see the process as akin to data storage, preserving the organic record of their thoughts and memories until these can be downloaded onto some new medium. ... the legal and financial questions surrounding cryonics require serious believers to make plans in the present, before they start their hiatus. Since cryonics remains well outside the mainstream, most end-of-life matters have yet to be thought through as temporary-suspension-of-life concerns. Ordinarily, at death, social security numbers are cancelled and made public, and citizenship privileges such as voting are revoked (at least in most jurisdictions). What would the temporarily dead need to do to put their legal status on ice along with their bodies?" If you want a serious consideration of the details, you might look at some of Rudi Hoffman's articles on cryonics and financial planning.

Link: http://www.businessinsider.com/financial-planning-for-the-formerly-deceased-2011-5

A Profile of Laura Deming, Thiel Foundation Fellowship Recipient

Posted: at 3:57 pm


At Forbes, a profile of one of the Thiel Fellowship recipients who focuses on longevity science: "Deming started working in a research lab when she was 12, enrolled at MIT at age 14 and last month, the now 17 year-old was awarded one of 24 $100,000 Thiel Foundation Fellowships for her work in the realm of anti-aging, specifically efforts to identify the genes that control aging and to use discoveries about age-defying therapies effective in worms to unlock the key to extending the human lifespan ... I had a fantastic childhood. Growing up, I had complete freedom to investigate whatever I was interested in, so I puzzled around with math and science, and got hooked on biology. When I was 12, Cynthia Kenyon, one of the coolest people I know, let me come to her lab. She works with a wonderful little worm called C. elegans, so I got to spend the next few years peering down a microscope at the fascinating critters. Then I went to MIT. I'm leaving as a physics major after a whirlwind couple of years spent exploring the magical properties of the quantum realm. ... 'I'd been mulling over what to do after college. The optimal scenario I came up with was exactly what the 20 Under 20 program offers; an opportunity to spend two years working to extend the human healthspan.' She will take up her award in the fall and will initially focus on identifying promising anti-aging research projects that are close to commercialization."

Link: http://blogs.forbes.com/jmaureenhenderson/2011/06/20/meet-the-teen-who-got-paid-100-000-to-drop-out-of-school/

The Already Forgotten Past and the Nascent Future

Posted: at 3:57 pm


Modern advocacy for engineered longevity and methods of preventing permanent death (such as cryonics) began in earnest in the 1970s, give or take, and has thus been around for long enough to establish a distinct and fascinating cultural past that most younger people are unaware of. The last decades of the last century are being buried rapidly indeed. The more thoughtful older folk who lived through that past there are sponsoring a growing range of initiatives to help ensure the continuation and growth of this present community of advocates, supporters, writers, and researchers. It is in everyone's interest for there to be more people working on human life extension, talking about it, and advocating for longer, healthier lives.

In this sense, the future is something that is constructed, not something that just unfolds without any effort on anyone's part - and that includes the future of communities. If there is growth it is because people planned carefully and worked hard to create that growth. Following this theme, in recent posts over at Depressed Metabolism you'll find both a little of the past and a little of the present work to build the future of the cryonics community:

Gerald Feinberg on physics and life extension

Gerald Feinberg, a Columbia university physicist who, among other things, hypothesized the existence of the muon neutrino, had a strong interest in the future of science and life extension. In 1966 he published the article "Physics and Life Prolongation" in Physics Today in which he reviews cryobiology research ... Feinberg recognized that it might be possible for people dying today to benefit from future advances in science in the absence of perfected techniques.

Teens & Twenties 2011 Gathering

On the evening of Thursday, May 19 and on Friday, May 20, I attended the 2011 (2nd annual) Teens & Twenties young cryonicists gathering which preceded the Suspended Animation, Inc. conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

...

Many members of this group were impressively highly educated, mostly in computer technologies, and secondarily in biotechnologies. There were six Russians: five from KrioRus, and one from CryoFreedom. KrioRus is located near Moscow, whereas CryoFreedom is further south in Russia, closer to Ukraine. Dr. Yuri Pichugin (formerly the Cryonics Institute's cryobiologist), is associated with CryoFreedom. CryoFreedom advertises neuropreservation for $7,500. Although it currently has no human patients, two pets are in liquid nitrogen. I also learned that there is a man named Eugen Shumilov who is working to start a new cryonics company in St. Petersburg, Russia, but there was no representation of Shumilov's organization at this event.

There are two overlapping goals of the Teens & Twenties event. One is the opportunity for members of the Asset Presevation Group to meet the young cryonicists. The other is the opportunity for the widely dispersed young cryonicists to become acquainted with each other, and to build lasting networks (community building).

A little more on efforts to help build the next generation of cryonics supporters, advocates, and engineers can be found back in the Fight Aging! archives:

Cocaine-Related Heart Damage May Be ‘Silent’

Posted: at 3:57 pm


(HealthDay News) -- Heart damage caused by heavy cocaine use can occur without producing any symptoms, according to a new study.

Researchers assessed the heart health of 30 long-term cocaine users, average age 37, who entered a drug rehabilitation program 48 hours after they last used cocaine. They had been using cocaine for an average of 12 years and consumed about 5.5 grams of cocaine per day.

Snorting was the most common way of using cocaine, but 10 said they injected intravenously and two said they smoked it (crack cocaine).

More than half of the those addicted to cocaine also used other substances -- such as heroin and alcohol -- and one in five was infected with either hepatitis C or HIV.

Heart function was normal in all the daily cocaine users, but 12 had localized abnormalities, 83 percent had structural damage, and 47 percent had swelling (edema) in the lower left ventricle. Edema was associated with greater cocaine consumption. Read more...

Cardiofy Heart Care Supplement

Kurt May to Join International Stem Cell Corporation as Senior Vice President

Posted: at 3:57 pm



Andrey Semechkin, Ph.D., CEO of International Stem Cell Corporation (OTCBB:ISCOE) ("ISCO") announced today that Kurt May, a highly experienced senior business executive and biotechnology entrepreneur, is concluding his service as a faculty member at the University of San Diego's School of Business Administration and is joining ISCO as a Senior Vice President.


Mr. May's duties will include mergers and acquisitions and development of new international collaborations, and he will work directly with Dr. Semechkin in implementing the Company's business model of combining cutting-edge scientific research and building multiple revenue streams to support that research.


Prior to joining ISCO, Mr. May was a senior executive with GTE Corporation, a Fortune 50 company, where he enjoyed 23 years of progressive management experience. Mr. May then went on to serve as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer with PriceSmart Inc. Since 2001 Mr. May has founded and led a privately owned biotech company, Psynomics Inc., as CEO. Psynomics Inc. is a spin out of the University of California San Diego, where Mr. May served as a faculty member and Assistant Dean of the Rady School of Management from 2005 until 2009.


"Mr. May strengthens an accomplished management team at ISCO, and I am delighted that we attracted a professional of his caliber to our Company," said ISCO'S CEO, Dr. Semechkin.


About International Stem Cell Corporation
International Stem Cell Corporation is focused on the therapeutic applications of human parthenogenetic stem cells (hpSCs) and the development and commercialization of cell-based research and cosmetic products. ISCO's core technology, parthenogenesis, results in the creation of pluripotent human stem cells from unfertilized oocytes (eggs). hpSCs avoid ethical issues associated with the use or destruction of viable human embryos. ISCO scientists have created the first parthenogenic, homozygous stem cell line that can be a source of therapeutic cells with minimal immune rejection after transplantation into hundreds of millions of individuals of differing genders, ages and racial background. This offers the potential to create the first true stem cell bank, UniStemCell™. ISCO also produces and markets specialized cells and growth media for therapeutic research worldwide through its subsidiary Lifeline Cell Technology, and cell-based skin care products through its subsidiary Lifeline Skin Care. More information is available at http://www.internationalstemcell.com.



To subscribe to receive ongoing corporate communications, please click on the following link:http://www.b2i.us/irpass.asp?BzID=1468&to=ea&s=0.


Forward-looking Statements
Statements pertaining to anticipated developments, and other opportunities for the company and its subsidiaries, along with other statements about the future expectations, beliefs, goals, plans, or prospects expressed by management constitute forward-looking statements. Any statements that are not historical fact (including, but not limited to statements that contain words such as "will," "believes," "plans," "anticipates," "expects," "estimates,") should also be considered to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, risks inherent in the development and/or commercialization of potential products, competition, regulatory approvals, need and ability to obtain future capital, application of capital resources among competing uses, and maintenance of intellectual property rights. Actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in these forward-looking statements and as such should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect the company's business, particularly those mentioned in the cautionary statements found in the company's Securities and Exchange Commission filings. The company disclaims any intent or obligation to update forward-looking statements.
http://cts.businesswire.com/ct/CT?id=bwnews&sty=20110621005505r1&sid=14230&distro=ftp
International Stem Cell Corporation
Andrey Semechkin, PhD
CEO & President
760-940-6383
aes@intlstemcell.com

or:
Lippert/Heilshorn & Associates
Don Markley, 310-691-7100
dmarkley@lhai.com

International Stem Cell Corporation (ISCO) Announces That Donna Queen, Former President and CEO of ZO SKIN HEALTH, the Luxury Brand Created by Zein Obagi, MD, Has Joined ISCO Executive Team

Posted: at 3:57 pm


International Stem Cell Corporation (OTCBB:ISCOE) announced today that Donna Queen has joined ISCO's executive team. Ms. Queen will be primarily responsible for ISCO's wholly owned subsidiary Lifeline Skin Care's (Lifeline) brand identity and international marketing as well as broadening the range of Lifeline products currently available.


Prior to joining ISCO, Ms. Queen was President and CEO of ZO SKIN HEALTH® by Zein Obagi, MD. Dr. Obagi is the dermatologist who created the original Obagi Nu-Derm skincare system, which has since become the leading physician-dispensed brand of anti-aging skincare. Earlier Ms. Queen founded and led one of Virginia's largest advertising and marketing agencies, specializing in aesthetic and dermatological marketing and brand development.


Dr. Andrey Semechkin, President and CEO of ISCO, commented: "I'm very pleased that Ms. Queen has joined our team. Ms. Queen's industry experience and expertise particularly in marketing prescription-based products will be invaluable as we expand our skin care business and further enhance our line of products."


Ms. Queen adds, "I'm very excited to be joining such a dynamic, science-driven company. There have been no recent meaningful technological breakthroughs in skin care, but with ISCO's scientific leadership in stem cells and their knowledge of skin tissue physiology we have an opportunity to continue to deliver new and innovative treatments."


ISCO previously announced sales of approximately $1.1 million from the pilot direct-to-consumer launch of Lifeline's first two products, an anti-aging Day Serum and a Night Serum. These products were developed by ISCO's scientific research team in collaboration with internationally recognized cosmetics experts. The serums contain an extract from ISCO?s proprietary human parthenogenetic stem cells combined with antioxidants and botanically derived ingredients. Using these serums on a regular basis provides significant benefits to the skin including improvement in skin tone and elasticity and the improvement in the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, results that have been independently established by clinical studies performed at industry-leading testing laboratories. The serums can be purchased by visiting Lifeline?s website at http://www.lifelineskincare.com and are also available at selected luxury spas and physicians' offices in the United States.


About International Stem Cell Corporation
International Stem Cell Corporation is focused on the therapeutic applications of human parthenogenetic stem cells and the development and commercialization of cell-based research and cosmetic products. ISCO's core technology, parthenogenesis, results in the creation of pluripotent human stem cells from unfertilized oocytes (eggs). hpSCs avoid ethical issues associated with the use or destruction of viable human embryos. ISCO scientists have created the first parthenogenic, homozygous stem cell line that can be a source of therapeutic cells with minimal immune rejection after transplantation into hundreds of millions of individuals of differing genders, ages and racial background. This offers the potential to create the first true stem cell bank, UniStemCell™. ISCO also produces and markets specialized cells and growth media for therapeutic research worldwide through its subsidiary Lifeline Cell Technology, and cell-based skin care products through its subsidiary Lifeline Skin Care. More information is available at http://www.internationalstemcell.com.


To subscribe to receive ongoing corporate communications, please click on the following link:http://www.b2i.us/irpass.asp?BzID=1468&to=ea&s=0.


Forward-looking Statements
Statements pertaining to anticipated developments, product development and marketing plans, and other opportunities for the company and its subsidiaries, along with other statements about the future expectations, beliefs, goals, plans, or prospects expressed by management constitute forward-looking statements. Any statements that are not historical fact (including, but not limited to statements that contain words such as "will," "believes," "plans," "anticipates," "expects," "estimates,") should also be considered to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, risks inherent in the development and/or commercialization of potential products, competition, regulatory approvals, need and ability to obtain future capital, application of capital resources among competing uses, and maintenance of intellectual property rights. Actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in these forward-looking statements and as such should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect the company's business, particularly those mentioned in the cautionary statements found in the company's Securities and Exchange Commission filings. The company disclaims any intent or obligation to update forward-looking statements.


http://cts.businesswire.com/ct/CT?id=bwnews&sty=20110616005464r1&sid=14230&distro=ftp
International Stem Cell Corporation
760-940-6383
Ruslan Semechkin, PhD
Vice President, ISCO
CEO, Lifeline Skin Care
ras@intlstemcell.com

or
Simon Craw, PhD
Vice President, ISCO
sc@intlstemcell.com
or
Lippert/Heilshorn & Associates
Don Markley
310-691-7100
dmarkley@lhai.com

International Stem Cell Corporation Discovers Method to Produce Uncontaminated Liver Cells: New Platform to Produce Various Cell Types Free From Undifferentiated, Potentially Tumorigenic, Cells

Posted: at 3:57 pm


International Stem Cell Corporation (OTCBB:ISCOE) announces the discovery of a novel, patent-pending technology to produce unlimited numbers of liver cells (hepatocytes) that are free of contamination with potentially dangerous undifferentiated cells. The technology is based on the natural, physiological properties of the cellular environment, and does not require any additional purification of the final product. The starting materials for the production are pluripotent stem cells, either ISCO's proprietary human parthenogenetic stem cells (hpSCs) or human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).


The technology is described in a new article that will appear in Cell Transplantation, the Regenerative Medicine Journal (currently the article is available only in electronic form). The published data also reinforce that hpSCs can provide the cellular material necessary for the implementation of cell-based therapies.


Marie Csete, M.D., Ph.D., co-author of the paper, said, "Derivation of differentiated cell products that are not contaminated with undifferentiated cells solves a major technical roadblock in the development of all pluripotent stem cell-based therapies because undifferentiated stem cells with tumorigenic potential can persist through long differentiation protocols. Therefore methods to generate pure differentiated cells for transplantation are critical for creating successful cell therapies. Furthermore, the elegant technology developed by ISCO scientists to enforce critical steps in differentiation illustrates the power and importance of basic engineering tools in stem cell biology."


Nikolay Turovets, Ph.D., Director of Research and Therapeutic Development at ISCO and co-author of the paper stated, "The technology discovered by our research team is based on reproducing features of the normal human embryonic microenvironment. The method uses a differentiation device that incorporates a three-dimensional extracellular matrix, combined with a porous membrane. Treatment of undifferentiated cells above the membrane using differentiation-directed proteins results in permitting the desired cells to migrate through the membrane into the matrix, where they further differentiate into functional hepatocytes."


Jeffrey Fair, M.D., liver transplant surgeon and Director of Translational Research for the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center and Department of Surgery in Los Angeles, and co-author of the paper said, "Derivatives of HLA-homozygous hpSCs are likely to be significantly less susceptible to immune rejection after transplantation, thus offering major advantages over other pluripotent cell sources of hepatocytes. In the paper, we demonstrated that hepatocytes derived from hpSCs in this differentiation system demonstrate activities that are missing in a number of metabolic liver diseases, such as expression of AAT and OTC genes. Thus, personalized HLA-matching, as well as presence of the required activities make the pure hepatocyte population derived from hpSCs an attractive development candidate for cell therapy of metabolic liver diseases, urea cycle disorders, AAT-deficiency or other liver diseases in which a single hepatocyte product can ameliorate disease."


The approach used to derive a pure hepatocyte population is a technology platform that may allow derivation of various cell populations from different sources.


Andrey Semechkin, Ph.D., President and CEO of ISCO, and co-author of the paper stated, "We have discovered technology that has a number of features and advantages, and our plans are to expand the applications of this platform to develop new products. This system is universal and does not depend of the particularities of cell lines. As such it could be successfully used with hpSCs, hESCs and, we believe, with induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs). Because isolation of undifferentiated cells happens at the first step of the differentiation procedure, the technology could be used to isolate other cell types, for example pancreatic or heart cells. Also, because technology is based on a natural process, cell separation is accomplished without any cell damage, in contrast to physical purification methods such as FACS, or magnetic sorting."


An electronic pre-copy-edited version of the paper entitled "Derivation of high-purity definitive endoderm from human parthenogenetic stem cells using an in vitro analog of the primitive streak" is available at: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/pre-prints/ct0284agapova.


A color version of the paper will be available when the print publication is issued. Prior to print publication, color figures can be obtained upon request from Nikolay Turovets, PhD:nturovets@intlstemcell.com.


About International Stem Cell Corporation
International Stem Cell Corporation is focused on the therapeutic applications of human parthenogenetic stem cells and the development and commercialization of cell-based research and cosmetic products. ISCO's core technology, parthenogenesis, results in the creation of pluripotent human stem cells from unfertilized oocytes (eggs). hpSCs avoid ethical issues associated with the use or destruction of viable human embryos. ISCO scientists have created the first parthenogenic, homozygous stem cell line that can be a source of therapeutic cells with minimal immune rejection after transplantation into hundreds of millions of individuals of differing genders, ages and racial background. This offers the potential to create the first true stem cell bank, UniStemCell™. ISCO also produces and markets specialized cells and growth media for therapeutic research worldwide through its subsidiary Lifeline Cell Technology, and cell-based skin care products through its subsidiary Lifeline Skin Care. More information is available at http://www.internationalstemcell.com.
To subscribe to receive ongoing corporate communications, please click on the following link:http://www.b2i.us/irpass.asp?BzID=1468&to=ea&s=0.
Forward-looking Statements
Statements pertaining to anticipated developments, the potential production and benefits of stem cell lines, the potential applications and benefits of the new technology, and other opportunities for the company and its subsidiaries, along with other statements about the future expectations, beliefs, goals, plans, or prospects expressed by management constitute forward-looking statements. Any statements that are not historical fact (including, but not limited to statements that contain words such as "will," "believes," "plans," "anticipates," "expects," "estimates,") should also be considered to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, risks inherent in the development and/or commercialization of potential products and new technologies, regulatory approvals, need and ability to obtain future capital, application of capital resources among competing uses, and maintenance of intellectual property rights. Actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in these forward-looking statements and as such should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect the company's business, particularly those mentioned in the cautionary statements found in the company's Securities and Exchange Commission filings. The company disclaims any intent or obligation to update forward-looking statements.
http://cts.businesswire.com/ct/CT?id=bwnews&sty=20110614005644r1&sid=14230&distro=ftp
International Stem Cell Corporation
760-940-6383
Kenneth C. Aldrich
Chairman
kaldrich@intlstemcell.com

or
Nikolay Turovets, Ph.D.
Director of Research and Therapeutic Development
nturovets@intlstemcell.com
or:
Lippert/Heilshorn & Associates
Don Markley (dmarkley@lhai.com)
310-691-7100

Next Posts »



Page 11234..»