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Bono denies health scare

Posted: August 22, 2011 at 10:00 pm


Aug. 22 - U2 frontman Bono denies reports of health scare while on family holiday. Doug MacLaurin reports.

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Bono denies health scare

Super Model at 70 – Longevity Secrets from Sunny Griffin – Part 2

Posted: at 10:00 pm


The original super model from the 1960's shares her longevity secrets for how she has remained thin, beautiful, fit and healthy for the last 50 years through diet, skin care, exercise and a great attitude... For more Info, videos, and resources please visit : http://www.thecoolvegetarian.com

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Super Model at 70 - Longevity Secrets from Sunny Griffin - Part 2

Confirmed Dedicated Servers For MW3 PC – Longevity of Shooters

Posted: at 1:44 pm


twitter.com

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Confirmed Dedicated Servers For MW3 PC - Longevity of Shooters

Hundreds Line Up For Free Health Clinic

Posted: at 8:10 am


Free health screenings help many who are without health insurance.

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Hundreds Line Up For Free Health Clinic

Daniel Vitalis

Posted: at 8:10 am


Visit Daniel's store here - http://www.1shoppingcart.com http://www.danielvitalis.com http://www.facebook.com http://www.rawmodel.com http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com Check out this film!! Thank you Ricki Lake!! Daniel and Anthony discuss one of the segments of Daniel's presentation on April 1st 2011 at the Longevity Now Conference. Please join in on the discussion and leave your thoughts below if you feel the need

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Daniel Vitalis

Checking Up on Sirtris

Posted: August 21, 2011 at 3:56 pm


So what is Sirtris up to these days? The startup was founded to investigate a line of calorie restriction mimetic compounds based on sirtuin biochemistry, and acquired for a very large sum by GlaxoSmithKline. The hope was that something to modestly slow aging would emerge - though even if so, development would be sidelined into making a therapy for diabetes or something similar, as the FDA outright forbids the commercial development of therapies to treat aging. A sad state of affairs in the land once known and the land of the free, to be sure, but it is what is.

Unfortunately for Sirtris, though not for their early investors, little of practical use has so far emerged from their work. It looks very much like the best case end result will indeed be something like a drug candidate to alleviate some of the consequences of obesity, diabetes or metabolic syndrome, all conditions that the vast majority of sufferers could have avoided through leading a healthier lifestyle, and could still reverse by leading a healthier lifestyle. Given the state of the world today, a medicine like that may yet make a great deal of money for GlaxoSmithKline, but it's not going to do anything of significance for human life spans. So, on the whole, the money poured into Sirtris looks like a failure wearing the clothes of success - and the more so because a bunch of people are going to see that researchers and investors made out like bandits from the deal and follow the same path, rather than trying to do something more ambitious and more useful.

Sirtris has been in the news again of late, with the completion of the latest study on the drug candidate SRT1720. This one doesn't appear to do what was originally thought - manipulate sirtuins in beneficial ways - but it does appear to be protective in obese mice. I see more optimism in the press coverage than is merited by the results, I think; a cynic might write that off to the size of the budget and the sophistication of the public relations crew at GlaxoSmithKline.

Longer Lives for Obese Mice, With Hope for Humans of All Sizes

Sustaining the flickering hope that human aging might somehow be decelerated, researchers have found they can substantially extend the average life span of obese mice with a specially designed drug. The drug, SRT-1720, protects the mice from the usual diseases of obesity by reducing the amount of fat in the liver and increasing sensitivity to insulin.

A Drug to Live Longer? Yes! (But Only If You're a Fat Mouse)

In the new study, SRT-1720 appeared to give obese mice the physiology of much leaner animals, which spared them from some of the negative health effects of excess weight. But the scientists note that while these mice lived longer than untreated obese mice, they didn't live nearly as long as untreated, normal-weight animals. Further, when the researchers looked at the maximum life span of the SRT-1720-treated fat mice, it wasn't much different from that of untreated obese mice. That means that the drug may just help animals enjoy more of whatever life they have, rather than actually extending it by any significant amount.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

A Profile of the Halcyon Molecular Founders

Posted: at 3:56 pm


This is a UK press article on Halcyon Molecular, one of the new companies that has emerged from the pro-engineered-longevity community in recent years. You might also look back in the Fight Aging! archives for more on the views of the founders: "Even by Silicon Valley standards, the grand design drawn up by William and Michael Andregg is hugely ambitious. Halcyon Molecular, the company that the brothers founded in 2008, is developing a way to sequence the human genome - and thus unlock the deepest secrets of DNA - faster and cheaper than ever before. ... William is 29, Michael just a year older, and both are college drop-outs - but given Silicon Valley's impressive track record for nurturing and funding obsessive, unconventional young innovators, their age is hardly unusual. The surprise is the long-term mission of Halcyon Molecular: to solve "the biggest challenge humans can individually face - disease and mortality", as the mission-statement poster in their office reception says. Put another way, they're supercharging the effort to map life's biological code in almost unimaginable digital detail and, by doing so, ultimately, to attempt to conquer death itself." The difference between the here and now and 20 years ago is that you declare your plans to defeat aging and age-related death and both be taken seriously and raise large sums of money for research and development, both inside and outside the scientific community. There has been a sea change in attitudes towards engineered longevity as a goal, and that is one of the reasons that significant progress will be made in the years ahead: things happen when people start earnestly working to make them happen.

Link: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/2335404.html

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

The Million Year Life Span, Revisited

Posted: at 3:56 pm


An old Fight Aging! post is dusted off, rewritten, and published at h+ Magazine: "I'm not going to try to convince you that the foreseeable future is a wondrous place: either you accept the implications of the present rate of technological progress towards everything allowed by the laws of physics, in which case you've probably thought this all through at some point, or you don't. Life, space travel, artificial intelligence, the building blocks of matter: we'll have made large inroads into bending these all to our will within another half century. Many of us will live to see it even without the benefits of medical technologies yet to come: growing up without the internet in a 1960s or 1970s urban area will be the new 1900s farmboy youth come 2040. Just like the oldest old today, we will be immigrants from a strange and primitive near-past erased by progress, time travelers in our own lifetimes. A century is an exceptional life for a human, but far greater spans of years will be made possible by the technologies of the 21st century. I'll plant a flag way out there on the field and claim a million years ... Despite being out there, the million year life span is not an unsupported pipe dream. Living for a million years is a goal that can be envisaged in some detail today: the steps from here to there laid out, the necessary research and development plans outlined, and the whole considered within the framework of what is permissible under the laws of physics, and what the research community believes can be achieved within the next 20, 50, or 100 years."

Link: http://hplusmagazine.com/2011/08/19/the-million-year-life-span/

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

The Next Five Years Will Be a Transformative Period in Tissue Engineering

Posted: at 3:56 pm


Looking at the near time, it seems that the next five years will see the tissue engineering community move from a few trials and some impressive demonstrations to real, commercialized work available in a scattering of clinics. Few of those clinics will be in the US, of course, as the FDA will add a cost of years and vast sums through the entirely unnecessary process of going from "can do" to "can do and allowed to do" - but the capabilities will exist. Take this, for example:

Stem cell researchers in Hong Kong and the United States are trying to grow spare parts for the human heart that may be ready for tests on people within five years ... When you get a heart attack, there is a small time window for a cure when the damage is still small. You can cure with a patch, a small tissue, so you won't progress to late stage heart failure ... The team will use approved human embryonic stem cell lines to build these human heart muscle strips, as well as [biological pacemaker tissues] for people with arrhythmia, or irregular heart beat.

The team plans first to transplant these muscle strips and pacemakers into pigs, and, if successful, to move to human clinical trials where they will transplant parts of the heart that are grown using the patients' own stem cells in about five years.

You might compare the research effort discussed in the article quoted above to other recent work on patching a damaged heart using stem cells. The two are illustrative of quite different directions in regenerative medicine: one path is to put cells into the body and let them build new tissue and repair damage in situ, whilst the other is to build new tissue structures (or even entire organs) outside the body and then surgically implant them. Personally, I favor the former approach, provided it can be made to achieve the same degree of effectiveness in the future - despite advancing technology, surgery remains surgery, and not something that any sane person would want to undergo unless absolutely necessary.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

On Mitochondrial Function in Ames Dwarf Mice

Posted: at 3:55 pm


An open access paper on the biology of one of the longest-lived engineered mouse species: "The age-associated decline in tissue function has been attributed to ROS-mediated oxidative damage due to mitochondrial dysfunction. The long-lived Ames dwarf mouse exhibits resistance to oxidative stress, a physiological characteristic of longevity. It is not known, however, whether there are differences in the electron transport chain (ETC) functions in Ames tissues that are associated with their longevity. In these studies we analyzed enzyme activities of ETC complexes, CI-CV and the coupled CI-CII and CII-CIII activities of mitochondria from several tissues of young, middle aged and old Ames dwarf mice and their corresponding wild type controls to identify potential mitochondrial prolongevity functions. Our studies indicate that post-mitotic heart and skeletal muscle from Ames and wild-type mice show similar changes in ETC complex activities with aging, with the exception of complex IV. Furthermore, the kidney, a slowly proliferating tissue, shows dramatic differences in ETC functions unique to the Ames mice. Our data show that there are tissue specific mitochondrial functions that are characteristic of certain tissues of the long-lived Ames mouse. We propose that this may be a factor in the determination of extended lifespan of dwarf mice."

Link: http://impactaging.com/papers/v3/n8/full/100357.html

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

An Update on the SENS Foundation Academic Initiative

Posted: at 3:55 pm


The SENS Foundation Academic Initiative is a long-term project aimed at helping to build the research community of tomorrow - one interested in the repair and reversal of aging, rather than a next generation that is only interested in slowing down aging a little via manipulation of metabolism, a simple repeat of today's research community. Here is an update from the Foundation: "The SENS Foundation Academic Initiative's new structure is actively in the process of being implemented, and involves a number of significant changes. Among these are the separation of the Initiative into branches, an updated membership system that allows students to become involved more easily and in more ways, the creation of volunteer committees, and the addition of outreach projects to the Initiative's activities. ... There will be three branches: Research, Outreach, and Education. The Research branch will be focused on the actual accomplishment of scientific research. This research will always be done with an eye to publication, but its most important function will be to provide our students with learning experiences, to help them develop into career scientists. The Outreach branch will be focused on spreading the word about the Academic Initiative and about the SENS Foundation, while the Education branch will be focused on educating students about science and SENS. ... While the Academic Initiative has long helped students to complete research projects, it has not done much in the past to encourage students to be advocates of the Initiative and the SENS Foundation. This will change with the implementation of outreach projects. These will generally be simple, off-the-shelf projects that students can finish in an afternoon, such as printing fliers from a pre-made template and distributing them at their university."

Link: http://sens.org/node/2345

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

You Pays Your Money, You Takes Your Chances

Posted: at 3:55 pm


What happens across your lifetime to change you from young to old is known as stochastic damage - the integrity of your bodily systems nibbled away, one damaged or misplaced clump of atoms at a time. At the detail level of molecular machinery, this is basically random. But the process is statistically predictable when you start to look at the bigger picture: our bodies are all, sadly, headed downhill in much the same general direction, and we can even talk about trends, environmental factors, and speeds of decline when we examine large groups of people.

For you, personally, what this means is that you have a ticket to ride and you can steer the bounds of the possible by your actions. But there's no such thing as absolute control - there are only risks to be shifted one way or another. Laze around and grow fat, and watch the risk of diabetes, cancer, and dementia grow much larger. Or smoke and suffer the likely consequences. Or avoid doctors like the plague for two dozen years and you're making your own bad luck, slowly but surely.

Some people sail through all that exactly because they were lucky, or both lucky and possessed of rare protective genes. Equally, you could do everything right, live the healthiest life possible, and get nailed by cancer in your twenties, or by the sudden onset of an unsuspected genetic condition in your thirties, or by an autoimmune disease despite no history of it in your family. Or, hell, by some idiot operating heavy machinery without a license while you're minding your own business on the sidewalk. These things happen. They're rare, but the point is that they're on the ticket: all you can do is swing the odds.

Some people die young and despite living well: it happens. I'm sure we can all think of a few we've known. But that doesn't remove any of the value of living well, doing the right things for your health, and generally trying to keep on the right side of heavy machinery. It's a matter of odds. Too many people look at disease in later life as exclusively bad luck, whereas they in fact had a hand in moving the needle the wrong way:

Lifetime physical inactivity interacts with secondary aging (i.e., aging caused by diseases and environmental factors) in three patterns of response. First, lifetime physical inactivity confers no apparent effects on a given set of physiological functions. Second, lifetime physical inactivity accelerates secondary aging (e.g., speeding the reduction in bone mineral density, maximal oxygen consumption, and skeletal muscle strength and power), but does not alter the primary aging of these systems. Third, a lifetime of physical activity to the age of ~60-70 years old totally prevents decrements in some age-associated risk factors for major chronic diseases, such as endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. The present review provides ample and compelling evidence that physical inactivity has a large impact in shortening average life expectancy. In summary, physical inactivity plays a major role in the secondary aging of many essential physiological functions, and this aging can be prevented through a lifetime of physical activity.

In some things we can make our own luck; in others we can't. Not much that can be done today about the bolt from the blue cancer in your teens, or the genetics that dealt you a heart that'll have to be nursed like the engine in a second hand car for the rest of your life. But for the rest of it: the prepared and the foresighted have what looks like great luck in life - at least from the perspective of people who didn't pay attention to all the groundwork that led to that point.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

Proposing Concurrent Manipulation of Multiple Metabolic Pathways

Posted: at 3:55 pm


That part of the research community focused on manipulating metabolism to slow down aging has advanced to the point of considering multiple distinct simultaneous changes to achieve the desired end result: "Modern medicine is directed towards the prevention, detection and cure of individual diseases. Yet, current medical models inadequately describe aging-associated diseases. We now know that failure in longevity pathways including oxidative stress, multisystem dysregulation, inflammation, sarcopenia, protein deposition and atherosclerosis are associated with age-related diseases. Such longevity pathways are potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Interventions in specific pathways have been shown to ameliorate and postpone the aging phenotype by activation of multiple genes. The strategy that we propose in this paper is to apply interventions simultaneously on complementary longevity pathways to achieve a synergistic result. For instance, aging is known to attenuate the HSF1 pathway leading to production of very toxic beta-amyloid fibrils. Consequently, the FoxO pathway is activated, resulting in the formation of less toxic high molecular weight aggregates as a defense mechanism. Thus the simultaneous upregulation of the HSF1 and FoxO pathways could potentially decrease protein deposition and proteotoxicity, thereby retarding or possibly preventing the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. Modulating these two pathways may also delay the onset of other age-related pathologies including cognitive decline, cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease due to its multi-gene effect. "

Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21834787

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

The Cost of Inactivity

Posted: at 3:55 pm


Researchers find what looks to be a proxy measure for the degree to which a person is sedentary - but of course there might be other important correlations here, such as with wealth or intelligence: "Watching TV for an average of six hours a day could shorten the viewer's life expectancy by almost five years ...The impact rivals that of other well known behavioural risk factors, such as smoking and lack of exercise, the study suggests. Sedentary behaviour - as distinct from too little exercise - is associated with a higher risk of death, particularly from heart attack or stroke. Watching TV accounts for a substantial amount of sedentary activity, but its impact on life expectancy has not been assessed, say the authors. They used previously published data on the relationship between TV viewing time and death from analyses of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab), as well as Australian national population and mortality figures for 2008, to construct a lifetime risk framework. AusDiab is a national survey of a representative sample of the population, starting in 1999-2000, and involving more than 11,000 adults aged 25 or older. The authors then constructed a risk framework for the Australian population in 2008, based on the answers the survey participants had given, when quizzed about the total amount of time they had spent in the previous week watching TV or videos. ... These figures compare with the impact of other well known lifestyle factors on the risk of death from cardiovascular disease after the age of 50, including physical activity and obesity. For example, other research has shown that lifelong smoking is associated with the shortening of life expectancy by more than 4 years after the age of 50, with the average loss of life from one cigarette calculated to be 11 minutes - equivalent to half an hour of TV watching, according to the authors' risk framework." I applaud the researchers for finding a way to present their work that will likely get a lot of play in the media.

Link: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-08/bmj-dtq081511.php

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

Another Possible Avenue to Partial Rejuvenation of the Aged Immune System

Posted: at 3:55 pm


The aged immune system begins to fail at its job for a variety of reasons that seem to have more to do with its evolved structure and control systems than with the outright incapacity of immune cells, or the inability to generate more immune cells. The immune system evolved to work very effectively in younger life, and that comes at the cost of controlling processes that fall down badly in the long term.

A small reserve of memory cells is needed to respond effectively to previously encountered threats - one reserve per threat. The more threats you have encountered, the more cells become devoted to memory; eventually you don't have enough naive T cells left to mount any sort of effective defense.

Given the capabilities that remain in the body, an aged immune system could, in theory, get up to fight and fight well - but it doesn't. That shortcoming may be addressed by selectively manipulating the system and its cells, however. For example, in recent years researchers have demonstrated that we can (a) intervene via modern medicine to expand the population of useful immune cells, or (b) destroy the accumulation of useless immune cells and thereby immediately free up space so that the body creates more useful immune cells, or even (c) wipe out and recreate the entire immune system as a fresh start, which works to cure autoimmune diseases in which immune cells run amok and attack the body.

I noticed a research release today that discusses the identification of another potential source of useful cells in the aged immune system, cells normally left inactive thanks to the evolved control systems that focus on early life at the expense of later life. The researchers show that these cells can be activated for duty:

Professor Arne Akbar of UCL (University College London), who led this research, explains "Our immune systems get progressively weaker as we age because each time we recover from an infection a proportion of our white blood cells become deactivated. This is an important process that has probably evolved to prevent certain cancers, but as the proportion of inactive cells builds up over time our defences become weakened. What this research shows is that some of these cells are being actively switched off in our bodies by a mechanism which hadn't been identified before as important in ageing in the immune system. Whilst we wouldn't want to reactivate these cells permanently, we have an idea now of how to wake them from their slumber temporarily, just to give the immune system a little boost."

...

When the researchers blocked this newly identified pathway in the lab they found that the white blood cells appeared to be reactivated. Medicines which block this pathway are already being developed and tested for use in other treatments so the next step in this research is to explore further whether white blood cells could be reactivated in older people, and what benefits this could bring.

I see it as a good sign that there are a range of different potential lines of research that might lead to varying degrees of immune system rejuvenation, temporary or otherwise. Variety and competition are signs of a healthy field of medicine.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

Vitamin D deficiency unquestionably linked to bone fractures

Posted: at 3:54 pm


Recent research from Scotland reinforces the longstanding medical opinion that vitamin D deficiency leads to a significantly increased risk of bone fractures.

Among people with hip fractures referred to the Scottish fracture liaison service, 98 percent test positive for serious deficiencies in vitamin D. Supplementation with the vitamin, on the other hand, significantly reduces the risk of repeat fractures.

"Taking a supplement can make a difference quite quickly," said Stephen Gallacher, head of the liaison service. "Bone density can increase by 20 percent in a few months with enough vitamin D."

"We have found we can reduce fractures by something like 30 to 50 percent. It is our belief that we can significantly reduce the risk of fractures in the population by giving people anti-osteoporosis therapy and vitamin D supplements."Read more...

Cardiofy Heart Care Supplement

Source:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/integratedmedicine

International Stem Cell’s Q2 Revenues Nearly Triple by Deborah Sterescu

Posted: at 3:54 pm


International Stem Cell Corporation (ISCO) (OTCBB:ISCO) reported Wednesday that second quarter sales more than doubled to almost triple, while year-to-date sales jumped a whopping 271%, as the company's operating subsidiaries continue to generate more revenue.
In addition to its hugely potentially valuable stem cell therapy business, the company also two other operations that have reflected revenue growth in the meantime, including Lifeline Cell Technology, which sells its cell-culture products to researchers to grow human cells for pre-clinical research, and Lifeline Skin Care, which sells skin care products based on its parent's stem cell technology.
For the three months ending June 30, International Stem Cell saw revenues rise to $1.1 million, from $0.44 million a year earlier.
Year-to-date revenues totaled $2.6 million, versus $0.7 million for the same period in 2010, helped by a $1.7 million contribution from Lifeline Skin Care, and a $0.9 million addition from Lifeline Cell.
In the last quarter, Lifeline Cell gained over 200 new customers due to new product introductions and the development of distribution channels internationally, a strategy ISCO plans to continue.
Meanwhile, the company's skin care business is coming off a highly successful launch at the end of last year, exceeding its plans to sell 1,000 products, with 7,000 products sold initially. Lifeline Skin plans to aggressively kick start major marketing initiatives again in September.
While these two subsidiaries are busy chalking up revenues, ISCO, whose parthenogenetic stem cell technology can be used to derive pluripotent stem cells, meaning they can be transformed into any cell type in the body, has many important advantages at its fingertips.
Regenerative medicine is a market that is set to boom in the coming years, as more and more companies are developing therapies based on stem cell use. International Stem Cell's long-term goal is to be a universal supplier of stem cells for not just one, but a host of therapies.
The company's parthenogenetic stem cells are derived from unfertilized eggs, avoiding the ethical issues behind the destruction of viable human embryos. Like embryonic stem cells, they also have the capacity to become almost any cell type in the body, but have demonstrated they are better in terms of the immune system, as one single stem cell line can be genetically matched to millions of people, reducing the need for immunosuppressants.
Its plan is to establish a US bank of its clinical-grade human parthenogenetic stem cells that will be capable of being immune-matched to millions of patients, so that a physician could call up and request a specific cell type for people. The company, which recently received approvals to enroll around 3 US donors for its bank, already has a collection of ten human parthenogenetic stem cell lines used for research purposes, which were derived outside the US.
These cell lines could potentially be used to cure a number of diseases, including cancer, heart disease, liver disease, among many others. Already, the company has several trials in the works, and has successfully demonstrated in pre-clinical animal studies that its stem cells can be used to create viable liver cells. It has also started pre-clinical animal trials to create neuronal cells in the brain, to potentially cure Parkinson's disease.
Unsurprisingly, all this work to progress the company's technology has increased expenses, contributing to a $2.5 million loss in the second quarter, or a 3 cent loss per share.
Research and development costs grew on account of greater scientific projects, while general and administrative costs leapt on increased headcount as the company bulks up its management team.
International Stem Cell, with $3.6 million in the bank at the end of the quarter, said that it has not ruled out future capital raising, but it already has a facility that allows it to draw equity as necessary to secure its planned growth.

Source:
http://intlstemcell.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

International Stem Cell Corporation Announces Second Quarter 2011 Financial Results and Corporate Events

Posted: at 3:54 pm



International Stem Cell Corporation (OTCBB: ISCO), a biotechnology company that developed a powerful new stem cell technology called "parthenogenesis" which promises to significantly advance the field of regenerative medicine, today announced financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2011 and for the first six months of the fiscal year and provided an update on corporate events.

ISCO reported year-to-date revenues of $2.6 million compared to $0.7 million for the same time period in 2010, representing an increase of 271%. The increase in our revenues relates to sales generated by ISCO's wholly-owned subsidiaries Lifeline Skin Care (LSC) which contributed $1.7 million and Lifeline Cell Technology (LCT) which contributed $0.9 million of revenues.

Total year-to-date expenses, excluding cost of sales increased $2.0 million or 38%, compared to the first six months of the previous year. The most significant reasons for the increase in total expenses related to increases in R&D and G&A. Research & Development expenses increased primarily due to increased activity on our scientific projects. General & Administrative expenses increased primarily due to increased headcount, non-cash stock-based compensation and increased expenses related to business development activity and general corporate expenses.
Our cash balance at June 30, 2011 was $3.6 million. Net cash used in operating activities for the six months ended June 30, 2011 was $3.0 million.

Second Quarter 2011 Highlights:
-- The first U.S.-based donor was enrolled in ISCO's program to establish a bank of clinical-grade human parthenogenetic stem cells (hpSCs) capable of being immune-matched to millions of patients.

-- We strengthened our senior management team to assist in the continued development of the Company. Kurt May was appointed Senior Vice President responsible for mergers and acquisitions and development of new international collaborations. Donna Queen was added to the management team as Vice President of LSC, where she is responsible for marketing and business development.

-- We started a series of preclinical animal studies of neuronal cells derived from hpSCs. The studies will evaluate the in vivo safety and tumorigenicity of neuronal cells as well as their ability to develop into functioning dopaminergic neuron–like cells to treat Parkinson's disease.

-- We successfully completed the first series of preclinical testing of hepatocytes derived from hpSCs. In the transplantation mouse model, inoculated cells were capable of engrafting and surviving in specific niches within the liver, and were further developing into cells with essential hepatocyte-like features.

About International Stem Cell Corporation
International Stem Cell Corporation is focused on the therapeutic applications of human parthenogenetic stem cells and the development and commercialization of cell-based research and cosmetic products. ISCO's core technology, parthenogenesis, results in the creation of pluripotent human stem cells from unfertilized oocytes (eggs). hpSCs avoid ethical issues associated with the use or destruction of viable human embryos. ISCO scientists have created the first parthenogenic, homozygous stem cell line that can be a source of therapeutic cells with minimal immune rejection after transplantation into hundreds of millions of individuals of differing genders, ages and racial background. This offers the potential to create the first true stem cell bank, UniStemCell™. ISCO also produces and markets specialized cells and growth media for therapeutic research worldwide through its subsidiary Lifeline Cell Technology, and cell-based skin care products through its subsidiary Lifeline Skin Care. More information is available at http://www.internationalstemcell.com.
To subscribe to receive ongoing corporate communications, please click on the following link: http://www.b2i.us/irpass.asp?BzID=1468&to=ea&s=0.

International Stem Cell Corporation and Subsidiaries
(A Development Stage Company)
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition
June 30,
2011
December 31,
2010
(Restated)(1)
(Unaudited)
Assets
Cash and cash equivalents
$
3,581,933
$
5,782,027
Accounts receivable
341,666
738,506
Inventory
1,329,433
856,083
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
290,196
228,338
Total current assets
5,543,228
7,604,954
Property and equipment, net
1,495,916
1,295,328
Patent licenses, net
1,056,562
986,714
Deposits and other assets
16,279
39,812
Total assets
$
8,111,985
$
9,926,808
Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity
Accounts payable
$
1,032,531
$
582,824
Accrued expenses
855,315
545,781
Deferred revenue
137,834
759,667
Advances
250,000
250,000
Warrants to purchase common stock
1,027,171
2,399,605
Total current liabilities
3,302,851
4,537,877
Commitments and contingencies
Stockholders' Equity
Common stock, $.001 par value, 200,000,000 shares authorized, 76,599,928 shares and 74,771,107 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively
76,600
74,771
Convertible preferred stock, $.001 par value, 20,000,000 shares authorized, 2,800,043 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively
2,800
2,800
Subscription receivable on common stock
-
(4,875
)
Additional paid-in capital
59,780,363
56,170,006
Deficit accumulated during the development stage
(55,050,629
)
(50,853,771
)
Total stockholders' equity
4,809,134
5,388,931
Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
$
8,111,985
$
9,926,808

(1)
The Company restated its financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2010, and the quarter ended March 31, 2011.
International Stem Cell Corporation and Subsidiaries
(A Development Stage Company)
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
June 30,
Six Months Ended
June 30,
Inception
(August 2001)
through
June 30,
2011
(Restated)(1)
2011
2010
(Restated)(1)
2011
(Restated)(1)
2010
(Restated)(1)
Revenues
Product sales
$
1,114,309
$
441,118
$
2,629,225
$
713,744
$
5,728,390
Royalties and license
-
-
-
-
135,000
Total revenue
$
1,114,309
$
441,118
$
2,629,225
$
713,744
$
5,863,390
Development expenses
Cost of sales
362,131
214,330
791,125
360,706
2,506,597
Research and development
1,128,869
754,000
2,132,279
1,338,069
15,992,557
Marketing
345,800
291,576
664,006
424,994
3,063,155
General and administrative
2,135,732
2,033,615
4,368,470
3,408,821
27,692,292
Total development expenses
3,972,532
3,293,521
7,955,880
5,532,590
49,254,601
Loss from development activities
(2,858,223
)
(2,852,403
)
(5,326,655
)
(4,818,846
)
(43,391,211
)
Other income (expense)
Settlement with related company
-
-
-
-
(92,613
)
Miscellaneous expense
(12,040
)
(256
)
(11,140
)
(20,649
)
(28,652
)
Dividend income
-
350
-
25,999
92,875
Interest expense
-
(6,805
)
-
(14,079
)
(2,225,074
)
Sublease income
2,450
2,125
4,650
3,525
303,083
Change in market value of warrants
478,669
7,083,365
1,349,518
(1,347,960
)
(2,380,664
)
Total other income (expense)
469,079
7,078,779
1,343,028
(1,353,164
)
(4,331,045
)
Income (loss) before income taxes
(2,389,144
)
4,226,376
(3,983,627
)
(6,172,010
)
(47,722,256
)
Provision for income taxes
-
-
-
-
6,800
Net income (loss)
$
(2,389,144
)
$
4,226,376
$
(3,983,627
)
$
(6,172,010
)
$
(47,729,056
)
Dividends on preferred stock
$
(107,203
)
$
-
$
(213,231
)
$
(1,238,067
)
$
(7,751,380
)
Net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders
$
(2,496,347
)
$
4,226,376
$
(4,196,858
)
$
(7,410,077
)
$
(55,480,436
)
Basic earnings per common share
$
(0.03
)
$
0.06
$
(0.06
)
$
(0.11
)
Diluted earnings per common share
$
(0.03
)
$
0.04
$
(0.06
)
$
(0.11
)
Share used in per share calculations:
Weighted average shares outstanding
76,340,016
68,676,504
75,842,071
64,789,250
Weighted average shares outstanding on a Fully Diluted Basis
76,340,016
114,797,830
75,842,071
64,789,250
(1)
The Company restated its financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2010, and the quarter ended March 31, 2011.
http://cts.businesswire.com/ct/CT?id=bwnews&sty=20110817005393r1&sid=14230&distro=ftp
International Stem Cell Corporation
Kenneth C. Aldrich, Chairman
760-940-6383
kaldrich@intlstemcell.com

Or
Ray Wood, CFO
760-940-6383
rwood@intlstemcell.com

Source:
http://intlstemcell.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Part 3: The Ellis Martin Report with Ken Aldrich of Int Stem Cell Corp (ISCO.OB)

Posted: at 3:54 pm



Ellis Martin of The Ellis Martin Report interviews Ken Aldrich of International Stem Cell Corporation (ISCO.OB) on the latest research involving stem cell technology utilizing unfertilized eggs, as a basis for cell generation with a goal toward organ transplants which are immune to rejection by the body...as well as other applications. Mr. Aldrich also discusses neurological applications focusing on reversing Parkinson's disease. Preventing and reversing blindness is another topic covered. 

Chttp://www.ellismartinreport.com  http://www.intstemcell.com 
contact:martinrepots@gmail.com

International Stem cell Corporation is a paid sponsor of The Ellis Martin Report

Source:
http://intlstemcell.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Event Schedule – Fitmarc Weekly Fitness Challenge

Posted: at 2:27 pm


Get set to "Change the shape of your city"! Atlanta, San Diego, Dallas, New Jersey

See the rest here:
Event Schedule - Fitmarc Weekly Fitness Challenge

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