About Us



Page 11234..»




Beauty Mantra – Anti-Ageing Skincare

Posted: September 30, 2011 at 11:40 pm


Watch Anti-Ageing Skincare - Beauty Mantra in HD.Subscribe to get daily updates on useful tips and tricks at http://www.youtube.com

Original post:
Beauty Mantra - Anti-Ageing Skincare

Men’s Health Q

Posted: at 2:39 am


Dr. Jonty Heaversedge talks about consequences of penis enlargement.

Read the original:
Men's Health Q

Holistic Medicine, What Is This?

Posted: at 2:39 am


Dr.

See more here:
Holistic Medicine, What Is This?

Sally Uses Lifecell Anti Aging Cream

Posted: at 2:39 am


tinyurl.com If you want to look younger for longer then go try LifeCell cream for 30 days risk free trial in $1.25 only. Visit this link to NOW know more tinyurl.com

Continued here:
Sally Uses Lifecell Anti Aging Cream

Nutrition For Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD – Educational Video

Posted: September 29, 2011 at 7:32 pm


The Film, "Is Your Child's Brain Starving?" Lecture on how diet can contribute to ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) by Dr.

Read the original here:
Nutrition For Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD - Educational Video

Record Turnout for URMC’s 8th Annual Men’s Health Day

Posted: at 7:32 pm


More than 450 men - and a few intrepid women - came out for URMC's health and wellness expo geared toward older men. Check out the crowds, screenings and displays and hear what guest speakers Matt Long and Beck of The Buzz 98.9 had to say about the event and the importance of men's health.

Original post:
Record Turnout for URMC's 8th Annual Men's Health Day

Art Of Longevity

Posted: at 7:32 pm


fottage from 1983, 1985, and 2003

View post:
Art Of Longevity

War Against Alternative Health Care

Posted: at 2:17 pm


Be My Friend http://www.myspace.com Texas Health Freedom Coalition http://www.texashealthfreedom.com Visit Radhia's Website at http://www.advancedhealthinstitute.com http://www.aimmd.com http://www.youtube.com War Against Alternative Health Care

Original post:
War Against Alternative Health Care

Fitness – Extreme Workout Challenge 2

Posted: at 2:16 pm


For more Ass Kicking Workouts and Brutal Exercise challenges visit http://www.BodyRock.Tv

Continued here:
Fitness - Extreme Workout Challenge 2

Is Bread Killing You? Gluten Intolerance, Nutrition Health

Posted: September 28, 2011 at 6:55 pm


Is Bread Killing You? Gluten Intolerance, Nutrition Health Radhia Psyhetruth

Excerpt from:
Is Bread Killing You? Gluten Intolerance, Nutrition Health

Health Matters: Music and the Mind

Posted: at 6:55 pm


What can music teach us about the mind and in turn what can brain science reveal about music? Though interest in music and the mind dates as far back as Plato, it's only the past decade that the field of music neuroscience has really begun in earnest

Read the rest here:
Health Matters: Music and the Mind

Fitness – Sexy Monkey Workout

Posted: September 27, 2011 at 9:07 am


To follow Zuzana's daily workouts and diet tips visit her free fitness blog: http://www.BodyRock.Tv

See the original post:
Fitness - Sexy Monkey Workout

Salt

Posted: at 9:07 am


Listen or download at itsrainmakingtime.com Salt and iodine are highly misunderstood, but vital to health. Dr. David Brownstein, the author of Salt: Your Way to Health and Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Cannot Live Without It, fills us in

Read more:
Salt

The Wellness Doc – Alternative Medicine Part 1 of 3

Posted: at 12:51 am


Learn about alternative medicine from Dr.

Read this article:
The Wellness Doc - Alternative Medicine Part 1 of 3

Fit Tip Nutrition Good VS Bad Fat, Protein and Carbohydrates

Posted: September 25, 2011 at 10:16 pm


http://www.empoweryourbody.com Monday Fit tip The Good and Bad Proteins, Carbs and Fats. Wednesday: Total Body Workout Friday- Aspire Higher! - Balance Plus get the answer to Mondays Question. About EYB: Empower Your Body is a Health

Read the original here:
Fit Tip Nutrition Good VS Bad Fat, Protein and Carbohydrates

harbor freight stick electrodes and longevity plasma / welder

Posted: at 10:16 pm


Harbor freight 7018 stick electrodes and Longevity weldmax lc-518d multiprocess stick tig plasma cutter. longevity-inc.com I just got this machine and I just wanted to try it out

Read more:
harbor freight stick electrodes and longevity plasma / welder

More SENS5 Conference Materials

Posted: at 4:04 pm


I see that Maria Konovalenko has posted notes on a few of the presentations on longevity science given at SENS5:

Dr. Laura Niklasson from Yale University is working on lung engineering. Human lung is an extremely complicated organ. There's 23 generations of branching of airways, they are up to 200 microns in diameter. 70 square meters for gas exchange. More than 100 million air sacks all together. Engineered lung must have right mechanical properties, autologous cells, adequate surface area for gas exchange and adequate barrier to prevent flooding of airways with blood constituents after implantation. ... Scientists implanted engineered half lung in a rat. It was 95% as efficient as a native lung in terms of gas exchange. But in several hours they got thrombosis. Also they saw a little bit of blood cells in airways, so the barrier was not perfect. After being improved this technique can be used to engineering human lungs.

...

John Jackson gave a beautiful overview of thymic involution and told us about the ongoing experiments in the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine on thymus engineering.

...

I personally found the talk by Dr. Charles Greer the most fascinating one. Aparently, there is a subsytem in our brain that is constantly regenerating. The rate and quality of this regeneration process doesn't decline with age. It's the olfactory system. Sensory neurons in olfactory system die every 6-8 weeks. Neurogenesis is constant. New neurons come from the subventricular zone. It's like a river of migrating neurons to olfactory bulb.

Meanwhile, the SENS Foundation volunteers are steadily uploading conference video to a YouTube channel - the John Jackson presentation on tissue engineering for the thymus is amongst those already available:

You might also find the following presentation to be of interest. It's a part of the broader LysoSENS program, which involves finding ways to safely remove the age-related build up of various damaging metabolic byproducts and other chemicals that our cellular recycling mechanisms normally struggle with. One of these compounds is 7-ketocholesterol:

7-ketocholesterol (7KC) is a cytotoxic oxysterol that plays a role in many age-related degenerative diseases. 7KC formation and accumulation occur in the lysosomes in a number of cell types, hindering enzymatic transformation, and increasing the chance for lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

We assayed the potential to mitigate 7KC cytotoxicity and enhance cell viability by transiently transfecting human fibroblasts to overexpress several 7KC-active enzymes. One of our engineered constructs, a lysosomally-targeted cholesterol oxidase that lacked isomerization activity, significantly increased cell viability

Orchestrated by the SENS Foundation, progress is slowly being made in developing the roots of what probably at first be drugs, designed molecules - possibly attached to targeting mechanisms like tailored nanoparticles - that either break down 7-ketcholesterol and other varied harmful compounds we'd be better off without or instruct the cell itself to better perform that task. The only thing stopping that progress from being faster is a lack of large-scale funding.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

Towards a Better Understanding of Nerve Repair

Posted: at 4:04 pm


Via ScienceDaily: researchers "have identified more than 70 genes that play a role in regenerating nerves after injury, providing biomedical researchers with a valuable set of genetic leads for use in developing therapies to repair spinal cord injuries and other common kinds of nerve damage such as stroke. ... the scientists detail their discoveries after an exhaustive two-year investigation of 654 genes suspected to be involved in regulating the growth of axons - the thread-like extensions of nerve cells that transmit electrical impulses to other nerve cells. ... We don't know much about how axons re-grow after they're damaged. When you have an injury to your spinal cord or you have a stroke you cause a lot of damage to your axons. And in your brain or spinal cord, regeneration is very inefficient. That's why spinal cord injuries are basically untreatable. ... While scientists in recent decades have gained a good understanding of how nerve cells, or neurons, develop their connections in the developing embryo, much less is known about how adult animals and humans repair - or fail to repair - those connections when axons are damaged. ... Of particular interest [are] the six genes that appear to repress the growth of axons. ... The discovery of these inhibitors is probably the most exciting finding [because] identifying and eliminating the inhibiting factors to the re-growth of axons could be just as essential as the biochemical pathways that promote axon re-growth in repairing spinal cord injuries and other kinds of nerve damage."

Link: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110921144604.htm

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

More on the State of Sirtuin Research

Posted: at 4:03 pm


From In the Pipeline: "I'd say that the whole sirtuin story has split into two huge arguments: (1) arguments about the sirtuin genes and enzymes themselves, and (2) arguments about the compounds used to investigate them, starting with resveratrol and going through the various sirtuin activators reported by Sirtris, both before and after their (costly) acquisition by GlaxoSmithKline. That division gets a bit blurry, since it's often those compounds that have been used to try to unravel the roles of the sirtuin enzymes, but there are ways to separate the controversies. I've followed the twists and turns of argument #2, and it has had plenty of those. It's not safe to summarize, but if I had to, I'd say that the closest thing to a current consensus is that (1) resveratrol is a completely unsuitable molecule as an example of a clean sirtuin activator, (2) the earlier literature on sirtuin activation assays is now superseded, because of some fundamental problems with the assay techniques, and (3) agreement has not been reached on what compounds are suitable sirtuin activators, and what their effects are in vivo. It's a mess, in other words. But what about argument #1, the more fundamental one about what sirtuins are in the first place? That's what these latest results address, and boy, do they ever not clear things up. There has been persistent talk in the field that the original model-organism life extension effects were difficult to reproduce, and now two groups (those of David Gems and Linda Partridge) at University College, London (whose labs I most likely walked past last week) have re-examined these. They find, on close inspection, that they cannot reproduce them. ... It's important to keep in mind that these aren't the first results of this kind. Others had reported problems with sirtuin effects on lifespan (or sirtuin ties to caloric restriction effects) in yeast, and as mentioned, this had been the stuff of talk in the field for some time. But now it's all out on the table, a direct challenge."

Link: http://pipeline.corante.com/archives/2011/09/22/the_latest_sirtuin_controversy.php

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

Peering at the Proteasome

Posted: at 4:03 pm


You might have noticed recent investigations into exactly how embryos generated by an old collection of cells - people like you and I - turn out to be made of young cells. After all, every other clump of cells we generate is also old.

Quite unexpectedly we found that the level of protein damage was relatively high in the embryo's unspecified cells, but then it decreased dramatically. A few days after the onset of cell differentiation, the protein damage level had gone down by 80-90 percent. We think this is a result of the damaged material being broken down.

If we're lucky there's a potent life-extending therapy in there somewhere, but of course the odds are good that the process by which the early embryo repairs most of its damage is tightly bound to the embryonic nature of its cellular machinery and will be somewhere between very challenging and next to impossible to safely apply to organized, differentiated structures of adult cells. The difference between "very challenging" and "next to impossible" is probably about twenty years of technological development in this era - but we shall see. This seems worth watching.

The researchers involved in this latest research into embryonic development think that the proteasome is the root of this profound embryonic damage repair process. This is a recycling mechanism in the cell that is separate and distinct from the lysosome that regular readers are probably sick of hearing about by now, focused on breaking down every errant protein that looks like it doesn't belong, is unwanted, or is somehow malfunctioning.

The rate of accumulation of damaged proteins and larger cellular components is important in determining the pace of aging, and this is illustrated by the degree to which the recycling processes of autophagy keeps turning up in investigations of various longevity-enhancing mutations and environmental circumstances. If a machine accumulates gunk and broken parts, then it tends to break down more rapidly and in more ways - and we are in effect very complex machines. Aging is damage. This model is somewhat complicated by the fact that we can repair ourselves, by those repair mechanisms - like the proteasome and lysosome - are also machines, and prone to damage. Once the spiral down starts it tends to accelerate, and eventually you wind up with the aptly named garbage catastrophe view of aging.

But here is an example of quite different research into aging and the activities of the proteasome - in yeast rather than people. Yet it still shows that, as for other forms of recycling mechanism, healthy life span lengthens as these cellular maintenance tool kits work harder.

Elevated Proteasome Capacity Extends Replicative Lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

The ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) is an integral part of the machinery that maintains cellular protein homeostasis and represents the major pathway for specific protein degradation in the cytoplasm and nuclei of eukaryotic cells. Its proteolytic capacity declines with age. In parallel, substrate load for the UPS increases in aging cells due to accumulated protein damage. This imbalance is thought to be an origin for the frequently observed accumulation of protein aggregates in aged cells and is thought to contribute to age-related cellular dysfunction.

In this study, we investigated the impact of proteasome capacity on replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a genetic system that allows manipulation of UPS abundance at the transcriptional level. The results obtained reveal a positive correlation between proteasome capacity and longevity, with reduced lifespan in cells with low proteasome abundance or activity and strong lifespan extension upon up-regulation of the UPS in a mechanism that is at least partially independent of known yeast longevity modulating pathways.

All told, the longevity science community hasn't devoted as much attention to the proteasome as to other housekeeping mechanisms, but that will probably change in the years ahead. All it takes is one widely noticed mouse study with an impact on aging to generate a great deal more attention.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

Next Posts »



Page 11234..»