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Family Acupuncture and Holistic Medicine

Posted: September 13, 2011 at 1:18 am


Family Acupuncture and Holistic Medicine

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Family Acupuncture and Holistic Medicine

DO NOT BUY Longevity

Posted: September 12, 2011 at 8:04 pm


IF YOU ARE THINKING ABOUT BUYING A LONGEVITY WELDER, PLEASE WATCH THIS FIRST!!!! TRUE STORY, I AM JUST TRYING TO SAVE SOMEONE ELSE A HEADACHE!! YOU STILL MAKE YOUR OWN DECISION!!

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DO NOT BUY Longevity

3rd National Conference: Age-Related Eye Disease (Oct. 11-12, 2011, London, United Kingdom, Europe)

Posted: September 11, 2011 at 3:58 pm


Cliquez pour écouter ce texte Age-Related Eye Disease, in association with British Journal of Hospital Medicine and International Journal of Ophthalmic Practice has been carefully designed to provide participants with updates on the current issues and latest developments in the management of elderly patients with eye disease. Whether you are an ophthalmologist, neurologist, optometrist, GP or a specialist nurse, Age-Related Eye Disease will give you the opportunity to update and extend your knowledge and to take away practical advice that you can translate into clinical practice.
Participants will benefit from: A greater understanding ofcorneal stiffening with age and strategies for corneal surgery and transplantation. Exploration of diabetic eye disease, including current and new treatment strategies and cataract surgery in the diabetic patient, assessments of risk factors and treatment options for wet and dry age-related macular degeneration, Insights into the management of chronic Uveitis in the elderly and the diagnosis and management of ocular lymphoma, examination of the role of the ophthalmic nurse and nurse-led clinics, a focus on glaucoma, including early detection, community shared care, and medical and surgical therapies.Source:
http://www.hon.ch/RSS/AUDIO/Conf/THEME/G07.574.124.xml

Ageing Globally Ageing Locally (Nov. 02-03, 2011, Dublin, Ireland, Europe)

Posted: at 3:58 pm


Cliquez pour écouter ce texte Pension reform, later retirement, longer but often unhealthier lives, changing family structures, new models of welfare and care: across the world today, governments, businesses and civic society are searching for policies and answers in these areas to get to grips with one of the most profound social transformations in history population ageing. A major international conference, "Ageing Globally Ageing Locally", taking place 2 & 3 November 2011, hosted by the Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland (CARDI) will address key issues arising from this global phenomenon. Featuring a host of international experts as well as leading researchers and professionals from the ageing sector in the island of Ireland, this event will explore a number of issues including how different countries address challenges and opportunities of population ageing, why global ageing matters to Ireland and how policy makers, business and service providers can best plan for changing demographics. This event will promote the value and role of ageing- related research specifically for policy and practice. It has been designed to appeal to a range of stakeholders, including policy makers, health, housing and social services providers, industry, voluntary and community organisations, researchers with an interest in ageing, carers and older people.Source:
http://www.hon.ch/RSS/AUDIO/Conf/THEME/G07.574.124.xml

Clinical Applications for Age Management Medicine (Nov. 03-06, 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, North America)

Posted: at 3:58 pm


Cliquez pour écouter ce texte Age Management Medicine stands at the forefront of 21stcentury medicine, incorporating proactive, preventiveprotocols that optimize health, restore endocrine balance,delay the indicators of aging and prevent prematuredisability and death. As a result, patients enjoy a higherquality of life, enhanced sense of well-being and a longerhealth span. Trained Age Management Medicine physiciansincorporate accepted markers for disease risk, implementingefficacious protocols as well as testing and assessmentmethodologies for early intervention practices.AMMG's comprehensive Fall 2011 conference agenda will expandthe track on Stem Cells that we began last year and presentclinically focused sessions and interactive paneldiscussions with experts to introduce and update physicianson the latest science-based clinical information, emergingmodalities and advanced techniques needed to implement agemanagement medicine in a new or existing practice. Thecurriculum will focus on lifestyle issues, physiological &biomedical conditions, diseases associated with aging thosegreatly impacting the patient population and most oftenconfronting physicians during an Age Management Medicineevaluation process as well as methods for developingpersonalized treatment programs.Source:
http://www.hon.ch/RSS/AUDIO/Conf/THEME/G07.574.124.xml

Geriatrics: A Primary Care Approach to the Aging Population (Jan. 30-Feb. 03, 2012, Sarasota, Florida, USA, North America)

Posted: at 3:58 pm


Cliquez pour écouter ce texte Daily Outline: Day 1 Delirium in the Elderly Current Concepts. Osteoporosis: Contemporary Diagnosis and Treatment. Evaluation and Treatment of Dementia in Seniors. Osteoarthritis: Diagnosis and Treatment in the Older Patient. Day 2 Advanced Nutritional Assessment and Therapy. Practical Points for the Musculoskeletal Exam for the Primary Care Provider. Vitamin B-12 and Vitamin D in Seniors. Geriatric Depression: Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment. Day 3 Exercise Program in the Elderly A Movement Whose Time Has Come. Sensible Approaches to Geriatric Infections. Rheumatologic Lab Tests and Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Elderly. A Practical Approach to Falls and Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly. Day 4 Sensible Prescribing Practices for the Elderly. Treatment of Chronic Pain in the Elderly. Contemporary Issues in End of Life Care. Office Orthopedics in the Older Patient. Day 5 Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis. Risk Management and Care of the Elderly. Gout and Pseudogout in the Elderly. Improving Communication Skills in Medical Practice.Source:
http://www.hon.ch/RSS/AUDIO/Conf/THEME/G07.574.124.xml

1st World Congress on Healthy Ageing (Mar. 19-22, 2012, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Asia)

Posted: at 3:58 pm


Cliquez pour écouter ce texte Co-sponsored by the World Health Organization; supported byMinistry of Health,Malaysia Organised by the MalaysianHealthy Ageing Society Themed Evolution: Holistic Ageing inan Age of Change To be held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia atthe Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre Dates: 19th 22nd March2012 Feature: First in the world to encompass bothmainstream and complimentary & alternative medicineSource:
http://www.hon.ch/RSS/AUDIO/Conf/THEME/G07.574.124.xml

Quietest SENS Conference Ever

Posted: at 3:58 pm


SENS5, the fifth biannual conference on the Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence, took place last week. Researchers working on ways - or the foundation of ways - to intervene in the aging process gathered together to talk about progress on the road to rejuvenation through biotechnology.

The purpose of the SENS conference series, like all the SENS initiatives (such as the journal Rejuvenation Research), is to expedite the development of truly effective therapies to postpone and treat human aging by tackling it as an engineering problem: not seeking elusive and probably illusory magic bullets, but instead enumerating the accumulating molecular and cellular changes that eventually kill us and identifying ways to repair - to reverse - those changes, rather than merely to slow down their further accumulation.

It seems, however, that the participants were so caught up in the conference schedule that they largely failed to post reports or commentaries online. There's a little Twitter activity, and a couple of videos for one of the presentations, but that's about it. Perhaps this is a sign of maturity for the internet: later years in which eager self-publishers feel they can let their hair down and stop trying quite so hard. Material will be posted online in the weeks ahead by SENS Foundation volunteers, and that will hopefully include a video archive to match those for past SENS conferences. Meanwhile, you might take in the YouTube videos posted to date:

The videos are for this presentation, which is a discussion of one approach to finding a cheap and effective way of keeping telomeres from eroding without making them too long in the process - a complex and challenging problem that has kept a number of research groups and startup companies occupied over the past decade.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

Increased Longevity in Mice via Polyamines and Gut Bacteria

Posted: at 3:58 pm


Polyamines have been of interest since spermadine was shown to extend life in mice. Another topic of growing interest is the influence of gut bacteria on metabolism and longevity, and here is research to link these two items: "In mammals, levels of polyamines (PAs) decrease during the ageing process; PAs are known to decrease systemic inflammation by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine synthesis in macrophages. ... The probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LKM512 is known to increase intestinal luminal PA concentrations. ... We supplemented the diet of 10-month-old Crj:CD-1 female mice with LKM512 for 11 months, while the controls received no supplementation. Survival rates were compared [and] LKM512-treated mice survived significantly longer than controls; moreover, skin ulcers and tumors were more common in the control mice." A caution here is that this result may well involve inadvertent calorie restriction: any dietary supplementation may affect appetite and thus level of caloric intake, and all studies have to be considered in light of the fact that even mild calorie restriction has beneficial effects on mouse health and life span.

Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3156754/

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

Towards Synthetic Collagen for Regenerative Medicine

Posted: at 3:57 pm


Via ScienceDaily: researchers "have unveiled a new method for making synthetic collagen. The new material, which forms from a liquid in as little as an hour, has many of the properties of natural collagen and may prove useful as a scaffold for regenerating new tissues and organs from stem cells. ... Our final product more closely resembles native collagen than anything that's previously been made, and we make that material using a self-assembly process that is remarkably similar to processes found in nature. ... Collagen, the most abundant protein in the body, is a key component of many tissues, including skin, tendons, ligaments, cartilage and blood vessels. Biomedical researchers in the burgeoning field of regenerative medicine, or tissue engineering, often use a combination of stem cells and collagen-like materials in their attempts to create laboratory-grown tissues that can be transplanted into patients without risk of immunological rejection. Animal-derived collagen, which has some inherent immunological risks, is the form of collagen most commonly used in reconstructive and cosmetic surgery today. ... Despite the abundance of collagen in the body, deciphering or recreating it has not been easy for scientists. One reason for this is the complexity collagen exhibits at different scales. ... Scientists must next determine whether cells can live and grow in the new material and whether it performs the same way in the body that native collagen does. ... clinical trials, if they prove warranted, are at least five years away."

Link: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110908124507.htm

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

A Primer on Compression of Morbidity

Posted: at 3:57 pm


If you spend much time reading around the topic of aging, human longevity, and medical progress, you'll soon run into the term "compression of morbidity." It is a hypothesis suggesting that advances in medical science are causing, or will cause, a compression of the terminal period of frailty, illness, and disability at the end of life, squeezing it into an ever-shorter fraction of the overall human life span. In colloquial use compression of morbidity is spoken of as a practical goal by medical researchers who do not wish to talk openly about extending human life for political or funding reasons. To my eyes the concept of compression of morbidity is rather too tied up with the self-defeating way in which gerontologists behaved with respect to human longevity for so many years: it makes it hard to discuss without pulling in the recent history of politics, funding organizations, and strategic debates within the aging research community. Some background from the archives can be found in the following posts:

Compression of morbidity as a concept also touches on debates and initiatives to persuade more of the research community to adopt repair-based research strategies such as SENS. These repair-based strategies for treating - and ultimately reversing - aging emerge fairly directly from the viewpoint that aging is little more than the effects of damage accumulation at the level of our cellular and molecular protein machinery. If you look at the body as a complex system that gathers damage, such as through the lens of reliability theory, compression of morbidity begins to seem a mirage of sorts. Any intervention that can slow or repair some of the biological damage that causes aging will extend life but not do much for the period of decline at the end - it just puts it off. This is the same for any machine. If you learn how to repair biological damage sufficiently comprehensively then you could put off that final decline indefinitely, which is the SENS goal. But if you stopped undergoing those periodic repairs, then you'd age just the same way and at the same pace as someone who never had the treatment.

But to return to the point of this post, which is to introduce the concept of compression of morbidity, I should mention that I stumbled across a good introductory open access paper today, written for a general audience by the originators of the compression of morbidity hypothesis. You might find it interesting:

Compression of Morbidity 1980-2011: A Focused Review of Paradigms and Progress

The Compression of Morbidity hypothesis - positing that the age of onset of chronic illness may be postponed more than the age at death and squeezing most of the morbidity in life into a shorter period with less lifetime disability - was introduced by our group in 1980. This paper is focused upon the evolution of the concept, the controversies and responses, the supportive multidisciplinary science, and the evolving lines of evidence that establish proof of concept.

Dive in and see what you think. The authors believe the data of the past decades illustrates that compression of morbidity is in fact occurring, and that improvement in the rate is possible given that no structured effort was expended towards this goal over that time. You might look at an older post here for a alternate explanation of the data with more of a damage-based view. No-one is arguing against the trend towards increasing life expectancy in the old and falling mortality rates for age-related diseases, but there is plenty of argument when it comes to the root causes of that trend - and therefore how to improve on it.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

Confounding Factors Abound

Posted: at 3:57 pm


It is now fairly well known that any animal study of longevity has to be controlled for calorie restriction, as the effects of even a modest change in dietary intake can outweigh the intended effects of the study, rendering the results useless. This is far from the only confounding factor out there, however. Here is some work on a different issue that might be problematic for longevity studies in worms: "The nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has been used to identify hundreds of genes that influence longevity and thereby demonstrate the strong influence of genetics on lifespan determination. In order to simplify lifespan studies in worms, many researchers have employed 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR) to inhibit the development of progeny. While FUdR has little impact on the lifespan of wild-type worms, we demonstrate that FUdR causes a dramatic, dose-dependent, twofold increase in the lifespan of the mitochondrial mutant gas-1. Thus, the concentration of FUdR employed in a lifespan study can determine whether a particular strain is long-lived or short-lived compared to wild-type." This sort of thing is one of the many reasons why it is better to weigh evidence across many studies and to be skeptical of any one study in isolation.

Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21893079

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/news/rss_feed.cfm

A Metastudy on Exercise and Dementia

Posted: at 3:57 pm


Via EurekAlert!: "Any exercise that gets the heart pumping may reduce the risk of dementia and slow the condition's progression once it starts ... Researchers examined the role of aerobic exercise in preserving cognitive abilities and concluded that it should not be overlooked as an important therapy against dementia. The researchers broadly defined exercise as enough aerobic physical activity to raise the heart rate and increase the body's need for oxygen. Examples include walking, gym workouts and activities at home such as shoveling snow or raking leaves. ... We culled through all the scientific literature we could find on the subject of exercise and cognition, including animal studies and observational studies, reviewing over 1,600 papers, with 130 bearing directly on this issue. We attempted to put together a balanced view of the subject. We concluded that you can make a very compelling argument for exercise as a disease-modifying strategy to prevent dementia and mild cognitive impairment, and for favorably modifying these processes once they have developed. ... The researchers note that brain imaging studies have consistently revealed objective evidence of favorable effects of exercise on human brain integrity. Also, they note, animal research has shown that exercise generates trophic factors that improve brain functioning, plus exercise facilitates brain connections (neuroplasticity). ... Whether addressing our patients in primary care or neurology clinics, we should continue to encourage exercise for not only general health, but also cognitive health."

Link: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-09/mc-aem090711.php

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

Carving Named Diseases From the Concept of Aging

Posted: at 3:57 pm


Seen from a considered distance, the culture of aging research - formed of researchers, regulators, and the interested public - operates in strange ways. No-one is permitted to treat aging: by decree of the regulators and complicity of the researchers that is taboo. But slow progress in treating aging is made nonetheless. That technological progress goes hand in hand with an intricate cultural dance that consists of splitting off pieces of the concept of aging and giving each piece a different and distinct name ("Alzheimer's disease," "osteoarthritis," "sarcopenia," and so forth). Once such a sliver of aging is named and fully accepted, it is no longer taboo to work towards treating it.

To a certain degree, culture shapes the progress of medical science. Strategies for repairing aging outright by focusing on common low-level molecular changes - like Engineered Negligible Senescence - don't mesh well with the structure of the mainstream culture of aging research, and so face an uphill battle to win greater adoption. Repair strategies do away with the whole business of parceling up a collection of end-stage symptoms of aging and declaring them a disease, and focus instead on a different vision for aging and the treatment of aging from the bottom up. Long-standing cultures are resistant to change, however, and especially resistant to radical change. That is far from the only hurdle in the way of progress, and the existence of centralized control over medicine and heavy regulation has a lot more to answer for than odd cultural ideas about how things should work, but those odd ideas are still a factor.

You can see some of this business of carving slivers from the concept of aging in a recently published retrospective article on research into the biology of neurodegenerative diseases:

Only 40 years ago it was widely believed that if you lived long enough, you would eventually experience serious cognitive decline, particularly with respect to memory. The implication was that achieving an advanced age was effectively equivalent to becoming senile - a word that implies mental defects or illness. ... Many discoveries made in the years since have given us better tools to study memory storage, resulting in a major shift away from the view of "aging as a disease" and towards the view of "aging as a risk factor" for neurological diseases. So why do some people age gracefully, exhibiting relatively minor - and at worst annoying - cognitive changes, while others manifest significant and disabling memory decline? Answers to these questions are fundamental for understanding both how to prevent disease and how to promote quality of life.

...

Looking back on the rather grim expectations concerning memory and the elderly that were held only a few decades ago, the vision today is very different and much more positive. ... The future holds great promise for the once remote dream of understanding the core biological processes required for optimal cognitive health during aging - and progress in this regard should also provide the needed backdrop for understanding and preventing the complex neurological diseases that can be superimposed on the aging brain.

The culture of the aging and broader life science research community is appropriately intricate: it's a large industry, working on exceedingly complex problems. But don't uncritically accept it for what it is; it never hurts to take a second look from a suitable distance and ask whether what you see is all that is possible, and whether it is good, useful, worse, or better than other plausible options.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

Spinal Fusion Through Stem Cells

Posted: at 3:57 pm


A modest new application of stem cells in therapy: researchers "have used a new, leading-edge stem cell therapy to promote the growth of bone tissue following the removal of cervical discs - the cushions between the bones in the neck - to relieve chronic, debilitating pain. [The procedure] used bone marrow-derived adult stem cells to promote the growth of the bone tissue essential for spinal fusion following surgery, as part of a nationwide, multicenter clinical trial of the therapy. ... We hope that this investigational procedure eventually will help those who undergo spinal fusion in the back as well as in the neck, and the knowledge gained about stem cells also will be applied in the near future to treat without surgery those suffering from back pain. ... In the surgery, called an anterior cervical discectomy, a cervical disc or multiple discs are removed via an incision in the front of the neck. The investigational stem cell therapy then is applied to promote fusion of the vertebrae across the space created by the disc removal. ... [Using existing methods], adequate spinal fusion fails to occur in 8 to 35 percent or more of patients, and persistent pain occurs in up to 60 percent of patients with fusion failure, which often necessitates additional surgery. ... A lack of effective new bone growth after spine fusion surgery can be a significant problem, especially in surgeries involving multiple spinal segments. This new technology may help patients grow new bone, and it avoids harvesting a bone graft from the patient's own hip or using bone from a deceased donor."

Link: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110906152501.htm

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

More Autophagy Research

Posted: at 3:57 pm


Autophagy is important in longevity, and research groups are investigating this process with an the intent of developing ways to safely manipulate it: "two cellular processes - lipid metabolism and autophagy - work together to influence worms' lifespan. Autophagy, a major mechanism cells use to digest and recycle their own contents, has become the subject of intense scientific scrutiny over the past few years, particularly since the process (or its malfunction) has been implicated in many human diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. This study provides a more detailed understanding of the roles autophagy and lipid metabolism play in aging. ... The particular worm model we used in this study is known to live longer than normal worms, but we didn't completely understand why. Our results suggest that increased autophagy has an anti-aging effect, possibly by promoting the activity of a fat-digesting enzyme. In other words, it seems that recycling fat is a good thing - at least for worms. ... When worms have more fat in supply than they have demand for, it has to be stored. In these long-lived worms however, there's activation of a seemingly futile cycle of breaking down fat and re-synthesizing it. Only we found that breaking down fat is actually beneficial and perhaps not so futile after all. ... On average, they survived 25 percent longer than their normal counterparts."

Link: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-09/smri-rfm083111.php

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

Why Research the Biology of Non-Mammals so Heavily?

Posted: at 3:57 pm


A comment from a reader on a recent zebrafish-related news post:

IMO it's a waste of money and scientists. We should only focus on mammals, because humans are no fish. It won't help us much, if at all.

That last assertion is not true, in fact. A great deal of exploratory life science research is first accomplished in species like fruit flies, nematode worms, yeast, zebrafish, and the like. Outside the realm of mammals there exists a small menagerie of species that have proven useful in the laboratory. Yet any of that work to ultimately make it to human clinics will first be repeated or confirmed in mammalian species such as mice, dogs, and primates - which might raise the question as to why researchers bother to work with flies, worms, yeast, and fish in the first place.

The answer to that question relates to the bottom line: money, time, resources. Research is by its very nature an exploratory and uncertain business, full of dead ends and unexpected pitfalls. A researcher wants to cover as much ground as he or she can for a given amount of time and money: the more that is explored, the greater the chance of finding a significant path forward. On the one hand, work with mammals will generally produce more useful information, but on the other hand working with mammals, even mice, is very expensive and time-consuming in comparison to working with flies and worms, which in turn is expensive and time-consuming in comparison to working with yeast. If infinite money and time were at hand, all research work would involve mammals, but resources are not infinite and the results of any given study are extremely uncertain.

Bear in mind that evolution produced flies, yeast, fish, and mammals from the same deep roots - and as it turned out, a lot of the mechanisms that link the operation of metabolism with variance of longevity within a species were (a) established very early on, and (b) then didn't change a great deal. It is counter-intuitive to think that researchers can learn useful things about the operation of human biology from yeast (or worms, or flies, or fish), but for some mechanisms and systems they can do just that. The further away from human biology that your model is, the more inference there must be, and the greater the risk that there is in fact some important difference between species that renders your work useless or less valuable - but that doesn't prevent work in lower species from being cost-effective.

So the story is that there is a trade-off in the life sciences between the usefulness of data and the cost of obtaining that data. When you are uncertain of the ultimate value of the work presently being undertaken - i.e. if it seems to have a high risk of failure, or a successful outcome is probably not that valuable in any case - then you won't want to spent much time and money on it until such time as it shapes up. If all indications show a good chance of success and a valuable result, then working with mammals starts to look like a better prospect, however. So we might say that work in flies, worms, yeast, and fish is undertaken in order to justify the cost of exploring the same biology in mammals.

Source:
http://www.longevitymeme.org/newsletter/latest_rss_feed.cfm

Cancer Patients’ Secondary Symptoms Need Attention: Study

Posted: at 3:57 pm


(HealthDay News) -- Many cancer patients with pain or depression also experience physical symptoms, such as fatigue, dry mouth and nausea, that can cause disability, a new study shows.

Doctors need to recognize and treat these symptoms in order to improve quality of life for cancer patients, said Dr. Kurt Kroenke, of the Richard Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indiana University, and Regenstrief Institute Inc. in Indianapolis, and colleagues.

They analyzed data from 405 cancer patients who had either pain or depression and found that all the patients had at least one of 22 physical symptoms examined in the study. More than half of patients reported 15 of the 22 symptoms.

The most common symptoms were fatigue (97.5 percent), difficulty sleeping (about 79 percent), pain in limbs or joints (78 percent), back pain (nearly 75 percent) and memory problems (72 percent).

The patients also reported an average of almost 17 disability days in the previous four weeks, including 5.7 days in bed and 11.2 days where they reduced their activity by 50 percent or more. Read more...

Cardiofy Heart Care Supplement

Source:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/integratedmedicine

International Stem Cell to Present at the Rodman & Renshaw Annual Global Investment Conference on September 12

Posted: at 3:56 pm


International Stem Cell Corporation (OTCBB: ISCO) announced today that Kenneth Aldrich, Chairman, is scheduled to present at the Rodman & Renshaw Annual Global Investment Conference on Monday, September 12, 2011 at 11:40 a.m. Eastern (8:40 a.m. Pacific). The conference takes place at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City.
A webcast of the International Stem Cell Corporation presentation can be viewed live at http://www.wsw.com/webcast/rrshq20/isco. The presentation will be archived and available at the same link for 90 days. After the conference, a link to the presentation will also be posted to the ISCO website, http://www.intlstemcell.com.
About International Stem Cell Corporation
International Stem Cell Corporation is focused on the therapeutic applications of human parthenogenetic stem cells (hpSCs) and the development and commercialization of cell-based research and cosmetic products. ISCO's core technology, parthenogenesis, results in the creation of pluripotent human stem cells from unfertilized oocytes (eggs). hpSCs avoid ethical issues associated with the use or destruction of viable human embryos. ISCO scientists have created the first parthenogenic, homozygous stem cell line that can be a source of therapeutic cells for hundreds of millions of individuals of differing genders, ages and racial background with minimal immune rejection after transplantation. hpSCs offer the potential to create the first true stem cell bank, UniStemCell™. ISCO also produces and markets specialized cells and growth media for therapeutic research worldwide through its subsidiary Lifeline Cell Technology, and cell-based skin care products through its subsidiary Lifeline Skin Care. More information is available at http://www.internationalstemcell.com.
To subscribe to receive ongoing corporate communications, please click on the following link: http://www.b2i.us/irpass.asp?BzID=1468&to=ea&s=0.
International Stem Cell Corporation
Kenneth C Aldrich, Chairman
760-940-6383
kaldrich@intlstemcell.com
or
Lippert/Heilshorn & Associates
Don Markley
310-691-7100
dmarkley@lhai.com

Source:
http://intlstemcell.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

Video: The Promising Cells Presented by International Stem Cell Corporation

Posted: at 3:56 pm


Ken Aldrich of International Stem Cell Corporation (ISCO.OB) on the latest research involving stem cell technology utilizing unfertilized eggs, as a basis for cell generation with a goal toward organ transplants which are immune to rejection by the body...as well as other applications. Mr. Aldrich also discusses neurological applications focusing on reversing Parkinson's disease.
This corporate video was produced by Big Sky Productions Inc. (BGSI.OB).
Executive Producer: Ellis Martin
Producer and Creative Director, Narrator, Editor: Bob Lange
http://www.ellismartinreport.com  http://www.intlstemcell.com  
contact: bigskymedia@yahoo.com

Source:
http://intlstemcell.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default?alt=rss

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