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Shrien Dewani extradition delayed by High Court on mental health grounds – Video

Posted: March 31, 2012 at 1:24 am


30-03-2012 05:23 The family of Anni Dewani, who was murdered on honeymoon in South Africa, on a High Court ruling delaying her husband's extradition on health grounds. Report by Adam Sich. Like us on Facebook at and follow us on Twitter at

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Shrien Dewani extradition delayed by High Court on mental health grounds - Video

The Health Assignment: Of grades and toilets – Video

Posted: at 12:15 am


30-03-2012 07:38 While many may take for granted having a toilet or a pit latrine at home or even schools the situation of lack of toilets is alarming in KIlifi County . The Kenya Open data has ranked Kilifi primary schools as amongst the worst in pupil toilet ratio. In thne health assignment today Irene Choge visited some schools in the county to see first hand how poor sanitation has affected learning in the county

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The Health Assignment: Of grades and toilets - Video

Enjoy your food while eating less

Posted: March 30, 2012 at 6:38 pm


CLIFTON As National Nutrition Month comes to a close, my last nutrition message to you is to "Enjoy your food while eating less." Food is meant to be enjoyed but, eating less is the key to managing your weight, leading a healthy lifestyle, and helping to prevent disease. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) encourages Americans to "Get Your Plate in Shape" not only during the month of March but today, and everyday. Here are three simple tips to help you enjoy your food while eating less:

Figure out an estimate of how many calories you need on a daily basis by logging onto http://www.choosemyplate.gov. Be mindful of this number as you plan your meals and snacks throughout the day. Focus on getting nutrient dense, lower calorie foods, and keep an eye on portion sizes.

By writing down everything you eat and drink, you are holding yourself accountable for your actions.

This is a great tool to help keep you in check. You will be more likely to stay within your caloric range if you jot down all the food and beverage items you consume throughout the day. Then, you can enter your food journal online for free with USDA's SuperTracker which can be found at the website above. SuperTracker helps you plan, analyze, and track your diet and physical activity.

By cooking your own meals at home, this enables you to save on sodium, total fat, and calories because you are in control of the ingredients and the portion sizes. You determine what is going on your plate for you and your family by choosing lean proteins, healthier fats, increasing fiber by adding fruits and vegetables, and using more herbs and spices, while reducing sodium intake. These are all key ingredients that help promote a healthy lifestyle.

Be sure to visit the Academy's National Nutrition Month website at http://www.eatright.org/nnm to find more resources on nutrition education including tips, games, recipes, and helpful tools that help spread the message of nutrition and wellness around the "Get Your Plate in Shape" theme.

D'Alto Nutrition, LLC is a nutrition communications and consulting company based in Clifton. Elisabeth D'Alto, owner, registered dietitian, and Clifton resident, focuses on educating clients and consumers on making knowledgeable food and nutrition choices in their everyday lives in order to promote optimal health and wellness. Contact her at http://www.daltonutrition. com. Follow her on Twitter @DaltoNutrition and "like" her on Facebook at Dalto Nutrition.

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Enjoy your food while eating less

Nutrition students will participate in service learning project at Longview nursing home tomorrow

Posted: at 6:38 pm


Nutrition students will participate in service learning project at Longview nursing home tomorrow

Several students studying nutrition at Kilgore College will take their expertise on the road tomorrow, hosting a family fun day for residents at Longview nursing home The Clairmont.

The students will be serving picnic-type lunches and will host activities during the event, which is set for 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 31.

Students participating this Saturday are members of adjunct faculty member Deborah Elliotts nutrition class.

This is a great way for KC students to give back to the community, said Patty Bell, Service Learning Director at KC. We are always looking for ways to give our students opportunities to create valuable learning experiences outside of the classroom.

According to Bell, the KC Service Learning Program is a teaching and learning strategy where students perform public service to benefit the community in order to achieve a courses learning objectives and fulfill personal goals.

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Nutrition students will participate in service learning project at Longview nursing home tomorrow

Eileen Koch & Company Client Malla Fitness Brings Body Pole to Venice

Posted: at 6:38 pm


LOS ANGELES, CA--(Marketwire -03/30/12)- Malla Fitness (www.mallafitness.com) hits the beaches of Venice for the Malla Beach Party this Saturday, March 31st. The event will showcase their revolutionary fitness program, and the innovative Body Pole -- a workout routine based off the traditional Indian sport of Mallakhamb. Elisabeth Rhm, best known for her roles in "Law & Order," "Big Shots," and "Heroes," will be hosting the highly anticipated event.

Throughout the day there will be refreshments, live music from DJ Mark Bell, and hourly demonstrations explaining how the Body Pole works to tone, train and test one's athletic abilities. In addition to traditional Mallakhamb performances, there will be an exclusive demonstration by world Mallakhamb champion Rajesh Mudki. The event will also feature the incredible Venice dance crew "Barholics."

Malla Fitness was inspired by Mallakhamb, the traditional Indian sport in which a gymnast performs feats and poses using a vertical pole or rope. The creators of Malla Fitness revolutionized this ancient workout routine with the Body Pole, a freestanding pole that has been ergonomically designed to enable people of all shapes and sizes. It contains a unique color-coding system to eliminate training errors and ensure maximum muscle activation, offering the best overall workout for your body.

Specialized for group fitness routines, the Body Pole provides a workout that is challenging, yet effective. Tried and tested by UK scientists, the calorie burn, as recorded by calorie watch, peaked to 490 calories in just 30 minutes! In comparison to other fitness programs, the Body Pole proves to increase heart rate, which burns maximum calories in a limited time.

The Malla Fitness program is making major waves in the fitness and health community, and has produced amazing results for people of all ages, shapes and sizes. Please join us this Saturday in Venice to get your bod beach-ready and enjoy great entertainment. The event is free, and open to the public.

The Malla Fitness Beach Party will take place Saturday, March 31, 2012 in Venice Beach off Winward Avenue (near the skate park) from 12:00pm-4:00pm.

For more information on the Malla Fitness Beach Party contact Eileen Koch of Eileen Koch & Company INC., a Public Relations, Marketing and Branding Agency at 310-441-1000, or email Eileen@eileenkoch.com. Visit http://www.eileenkoch.com.

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Eileen Koch & Company Client Malla Fitness Brings Body Pole to Venice

Food-nutrition crisis in Africa's drought-prone Sahel: UN

Posted: at 2:03 am


New York, Mar 29 : The food and nutrition crisis facing countries in West Africa's drought-prone Sahel region has continued to deteriorate at an alarming rate despite commendable early response efforts by governments and international aid agencies, a senior United Nations official said on Wednesday.

"We are in a race against time and some of the harshest climatic conditions on the planet," said the Director of Operations at the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), John Ging, after returning from a week-long mission to Niger, Burkina Faso and Mauritania.

"This is already an appalling crisis in terms of the scale and degree of human suffering and it will get worse unless the response plans are properly funded," he added. "It's a matter of life or death for millions who are on the brink."

More than 15 million people in the Sahel are directly affected by worsening food shortages and malnutrition brought on by the ongoing drought, which has been compounded by conflict and insecurity. Earlier this week, the Security Council expressed serious concern over the rapidly deteriorating humanitarian crisis there, saying that the presence of armed and terrorist groups, as well as the proliferation of weapons in the area, has exacerbated the problem.

An estimated 100,000 refugees fleeing conflict in Mali have sought shelter in neighbouring countries, and tens of thousands of migrant workers have returned from Libya and Cote d'Ivoire, meaning that they can no longer send remittances to their families. A crucial coping mechanism has therefore collapsed for poor communities who depended on the remittances, according to OCHA.

Ging underlined the urgent need to accelerate the pace of the response to the crisis. "More than 200,000 children died of malnutrition last year and over one million are threatened with severe acute malnutrition right now," he said.

At a meeting with representatives from donor countries in Nouakchott, the capital of Mauritania, the humanitarian official encouraged their continued generosity, highlighting the clearly visible and positive lifesaving impact of their funding so far.

However, response plans across the region are less than 40 per cent funded and the crisis is expected to peak in the coming months.

According to OCHA, close coordination between aid agencies and national governments in the development of response plans in the region is building on international best practice tailored to the specifics of each locality.

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Food-nutrition crisis in Africa's drought-prone Sahel: UN

Tour Report: Fitness: Flexibility key to golf swing

Posted: at 2:03 am


By Sean Cochran, Golf Fitness

We are all very aware the execution of a proficient golf swing requires the golfer to draw the club through a large range of motion. In order to complete this requirement of the golf swing a certain level of joint mobility and muscular flexibility is required.

If the golfer is lacking in either the joint mobility or muscular flexibility needed to draw the club on the intended swing path, we will most likely see some sort of compensation to offset these physical limitations affecting the swing. This situation can be very limiting in terms of development and improvement in the fundamentals of the golf swing. As a result, we as golfers understand the importance of flexibility for golf.

Where we commonly get off track relative to swing flexibility is what muscles require flexibility to execute a proficient golf swing. Not every muscle in the body needs to be flexible to execute a proficient swing.

To answer this question of muscular flexibility for golf we can turn our attention to the Mobility/Stability Pattern of Human Movement Principle. This principle developed by noted physical therapist Gray Cook explains how efficient athletic movement occurs.

An oversimplification of this exercise science principle states the golf swing requires joint mobility in the ankles, hips, thoracic spine (area of spine between shoulder blades), shoulders, and wrists.

In order for the aforementioned joints to be mobile, the muscles surrounding each of these joints must be extensible. If tightness exists in the muscles surrounding any of these joints, range of motion will most likely be limited, thus adversely affecting the golf swing.

Understanding this information provides a blue print for developing swing flexibility. In the most basic of terms, a flexibility program for golf must create extensibility in the musculature surrounding the ankles, hips, thoracic spine, shoulders, and wrists.

The hips tend to be a troublesome area for many golfers as it pertains to joint mobility. It is very common to find tightness in the muscles surrounding the hips limiting a golfer in the execution of a proficient swing.

scochranThe exercise

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Tour Report: Fitness: Flexibility key to golf swing

Raw Audio: High Court Dissects Health Care Act – Video

Posted: at 2:02 am


28-03-2012 13:30 Several Supreme Court justices seemed receptive Wednesday to the idea that portions of President Barack Obama's health care law can survive even if the court declares the centerpiece unconstitutional. (March 28) Subscribe to the Associated Press: bit.ly Download AP Mobile: http://www.ap.org Associated Press on Facebook: apne.ws Associated Press on Twitter: apne.ws Associated Press on Google+: bit.ly

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Raw Audio: High Court Dissects Health Care Act - Video

Health care costs to exceed $20,000 per family in 2012

Posted: at 2:02 am


Three days of Supreme Court arguments have left the fate of the 2010 health care reform law uncertain. What is certain, however, is that health care costs are continuing to eat away at consumers' budgets.

The cost to cover the typical family of four under an employer plan is expected to top $20,000 on health care this year, up more than 7% from last year, according to early projections by independent actuarial and health care consulting firm Milliman Inc. In 2002, the cost was just $9,235, the firm said.

The projected increase marks the fifth year in a row that health care costs will rise between 7% and 8% annually.

While employers still shoulder a majority of health care expenses, employees have been paying a larger portion of the total amount every year, according to Lorraine Mayne, principal and consulting actuary with Milliman.

Rising costs for employees is part of a long-term trend, said Deborah Chollet, senior fellow and health economist with Washington-based Mathematica Policy Research. "Employers have been unwilling to have their benefits costs rise at the rate that health care costs have risen," she said.

As a result, they have been passing along extra costs to employees in the form of higher deductibles and co-pays, as well as more expensive premiums.

Last year, workers' out-of-pocket costs rose 9.2% to $3,280 for a typical family of four, according to Milliman.

Those who buy insurance without an employer-provider plan are shelling out even more, Mayne said. The average premium for a family in a non-group plan was $7,102 in 2010, according to the nonprofit Kaiser Family Foundation.

Small business owner Matthew Cheng's health care costs rose by $600 to $7,891 last year. This year, he's looking at a much steeper bill.

What health care reform is (and isn't) doing now

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Health care costs to exceed $20,000 per family in 2012

Study suggests why some animals live longer

Posted: at 2:02 am


Public release date: 29-Mar-2012 [ | E-mail | Share ]

Contact: Samantha Martin 44-015-179-42248 University of Liverpool

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have developed a new method to detect proteins associated with longevity, which helps further our understanding into why some animals live longer than others.

The team looked at the genome of more than 30 mammalian species to identify proteins that evolve in connection with the longevity of a species. They found that a protein, important in responding to DNA damage, evolves and mutates in a non-random way in species that are longer-lived, suggesting that it is changing for a specific purpose. They found a similar pattern in proteins associated with metabolism, cholesterol and pathways involved in the recycling of proteins.

Findings show that if certain proteins are being selected by evolution to change in long-lived mammals like humans and elephants, then it is possible that these species have optimised pathways that repair molecular damage, compared to shorter-lived animals, such as mice.

The study, led by Dr Joao Pedro Magalhaes and postgraduate student, Yang Li, is the first to show evolutionary patterns in biological repair systems in long-lived animals and could, in the future, be used to help develop anti-ageing interventions by identifying proteins in long-lived species that better respond to, for example, DNA damage. Proteins associated with the degradation of damaged proteins, a process that has been connected to ageing, were also linked with the evolution of longevity in mammals.

Dr Magalhaes, from the University's Institute of Integrative Biology, said: "The genetic basis for longevity differences between species remains a major puzzle of biology. A mouse lives less than five years and yet humans can live to over 100 for example. If we can identify the proteins that allow some species to live longer than others we could use this knowledge to improve human health and slow the ageing process.

"We developed a method to detect proteins whose molecular evolution correlates with longevity of a species. The proteins we detected changed in a particular pattern, suggesting that evolution of these proteins was not by accident, but rather by design to cope with the biological processes impacted by ageing, such as DNA damage. The results suggest that long-lived animals were able to optimise bodily repair which will help them fend off the ageing process."

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The research is published in the American Aging Association's journal, AGE.

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Study suggests why some animals live longer

Why some animals live longer than others

Posted: at 2:02 am


ScienceDaily (Mar. 29, 2012) Scientists at the University of Liverpool have developed a new method to detect proteins associated with longevity, which helps further our understanding into why some animals live longer than others.

The team looked at the genome of more than 30 mammalian species to identify proteins that evolve in connection with the longevity of a species. They found that a protein, important in responding to DNA damage, evolves and mutates in a non-random way in species that are longer-lived, suggesting that it is changing for a specific purpose. They found a similar pattern in proteins associated with metabolism, cholesterol and pathways involved in the recycling of proteins.

Findings show that if certain proteins are being selected by evolution to change in long-lived mammals like humans and elephants, then it is possible that these species have optimized pathways that repair molecular damage, compared to shorter-lived animals, such as mice.

The study, led by Dr Joao Pedro Magalhaes and postgraduate student, Yang Li, is the first to show evolutionary patterns in biological repair systems in long-lived animals and could, in the future, be used to help develop anti-aging interventions by identifying proteins in long-lived species that better respond to, for example, DNA damage. Proteins associated with the degradation of damaged proteins, a process that has been connected to aging, were also linked with the evolution of longevity in mammals.

Dr Magalhaes, from the University's Institute of Integrative Biology, said: "The genetic basis for longevity differences between species remains a major puzzle of biology. A mouse lives less than five years and yet humans can live to over 100 for example. If we can identify the proteins that allow some species to live longer than others we could use this knowledge to improve human health and slow the aging process.

"We developed a method to detect proteins whose molecular evolution correlates with longevity of a species. The proteins we detected changed in a particular pattern, suggesting that evolution of these proteins was not by accident, but rather by design to cope with the biological processes impacted by aging, such as DNA damage. The results suggest that long-lived animals were able to optimise bodily repair which will help them fend off the aging process."

The research is published in the American Aging Association's journal, Age.

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Why some animals live longer than others

Do rich people live longer?

Posted: at 2:02 am


Those looking for a magic elixir to keep them healthy and happy need look no further than their bank account. Wealth and, more broadly, socioeconomic status play powerful roles in determining how long we live.

"It's clear that those who have less wealth will have fewer years to live than those with more wealth," says James Smith, senior economist at the research group Rand. The connection is so widely accepted that researchers have given it a name: "the wealth gradient in mortality." What's far more complicated to understand is why the connection exists, and whether wealth causes better health, or vice versa.

The longest-running longitudinal study of health, run by George Vaillant, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, found education to be one of the biggest determinants of longevity, along with behavioral factors -- excessive drinkers were more likely to die young, for example. Out of the 500-plus Harvard students and inner-city Boston men the study has followed since 1937, the Harvard students have lived an average of 10 years longer than the inner-city men, says Vaillant. In fact, three in 10 of the Harvard students reached age 90, compared with the 3% to 5% one would expect.

Among the inner-city men who attended college, health was just as good as that of Harvard students who attended college but not graduate school, says Vaillant. "(The Boston men) went to terrible colleges by Harvard standards, but they did get 16 years of education, and that absolutely evened the playing field," says Vaillant. People who go to college tend to drink less, smoke less, and are less likely to be obese, he adds, all factors that contribute to longevity. In fact, after controlling for education and other factors, Vaillant found that income alone had little effect on longevity.

People who pursue higher education, explains Vaillant, tend be more focused on the future, which probably also helps them make healthier choices. "In order to get an education, especially if you're poor, you have to think you have a future," he says.

Indeed, says Smith, one hypothesis is that "more-educated people are more forward-looking, and when they make decisions, they take into account the future more than uneducated people. A lot of things you might do don't have an immediate negative impact -- excessive drinking, smoking and doing drugs can (feel good in the short-term) -- but the fact is, it's going to kill you in the future." Another possibility is that people with higher levels of education are more likely to maintain their health, have better access to health care, and follow doctors' directions when it comes to taking pills or other instructions.

Smith's research also suggests that causality doesn't just run one way; health contributes to wealth, as well. "Because you are healthy and able to work, you are wealthier," he explains. At the same time, poor health often takes a toll on a person's wealth, either because it prevents one from working or because of expensive medical treatments. Taken together, researchers at the University of Chicago estimate that the gains in life expectancy between 1970 and 2000 resulted in an additional $3.2 trillion a year in national wealth.

Meanwhile, as income disparities continue to grow in this country, so do life expectancy disparities. According to an analysis by the Social Security Administration, life expectancy for 65-year-old men in the top half of the earnings distribution has increased by five years, to 21.5 more years. For those in the bottom half of the earnings distribution, life expectancy has increased just over one year, to 16.1 more years.

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Do rich people live longer?

Duality of Longevity Drug Explained

Posted: at 2:02 am


Rapamycin-induced longevity in mice can be uncoupled from diabetes-inducing side effects

Newswise PHILADELPHIA A Penn- and MIT-led team explained how rapamycin, a drug that extends mouse lifespan, also causes insulin resistance. The researchers showed in an animal model that they could, in principle, separate the effects, which depend on inhibiting two protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively.

The study suggests that molecules that specifically inhibit mTORC1 may combat age-related diseases without the insulin-resistance side effect, which can predispose people to diabetes.

Senior author Joseph A. Baur, PhD, assistant professor of Physiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Broad Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge, MA, describe their work in this weeks issue of Science. Baur is also a member of Penns Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism.

The hope is that in the future, we will be able to develop molecules that target mTORC1 specifically, separating out the beneficial effects of rapamycin on aging and disease, and leaving behind the insulin-resistance side effect, says Baur.

Our results demonstrate that reduced mTORC1 signaling is sufficient to extend lifespan and mTORC2 signaling has profound effects on metabolism, says co-first author Lan Ye, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Baur lab. Our findings indicate that mTORC2 may be an important player in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome."

One Compound, Many Effects Rapamycin extends the lifespan of yeast, flies, and mice and is also an immunosuppressant drug for organ transplants and an anti-cancer drug. It was first discovered as a byproduct of Streptomycin hygroscopicus, a bacterium found in a soil sample from Easter Island, an island also known as Rapa Nui, hence the name. Rapamycin was originally developed as an antifungal agent, but that use was abandoned when it was discovered to have immunosuppressive properties.

The mTOR complexes, for mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin, are proteins that regulate cell growth, movement, and survival, as well as protein synthesis and transcription. Specifically, there are two mTOR complexes and one mTOR protein. The mTOR protein is the core of both complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2), which behave differently based on their associated proteins. One or both of the mTOR complexes can be inappropriately activated in certain cancers, and dual-specific inhibitors are being developed as chemotherapeutic agents.

Several theories have been put forward by researchers to explain the observations that patients receiving rapamycin are more prone to developing glucose intolerance, which can lead to diabetes. Chronic treatment with rapamycin impairs glucose metabolism and the correct functioning of insulin in mice, despite extending lifespan. The research team demonstrated that rapamycin disrupts mTORC2 in the mice, and that mTORC2 is required for the insulin-mediated suppression of glucose metabolism in the liver.

On the other hand, they also demonstrated that decreasing mTORC1 signaling was sufficient to extend lifespan independently from changes in glucose metabolism. They used a mouse strain in which mTORC1 activity was decreased and saw that lifespan was extended by 14 percent, yet the animals had normal glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

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Duality of Longevity Drug Explained

Genetic study yields longevity clue

Posted: at 2:02 am


Published: March. 29, 2012 at 7:36 PM

LIVERPOOL, England, March 29 (UPI) -- British scientists say their genetic studies have helped detect proteins associated with longevity, helping explain why some animals live longer than others.

The researchers examined the genome of more than 30 mammalian species to identify proteins that evolve in connection with the longevity of a species, the University of Liverpool reported Thursday.

A particular protein -- involved in responding to DNA damage -- evolves and mutates in a non-random way in species that are longer-lived, the researchers found, suggesting it is changing for a specific purpose.

The study is the first to show evolutionary patterns in biological repair systems in long-lived animals, they said.

The findings may help develop anti-aging interventions by identifying proteins in long-lived species that better respond to DNA damage, they said.

"The genetic basis for longevity differences between species remains a major puzzle of biology," researcher Joao Pedro Magalhaes said. "A mouse lives less than five years and yet humans can live to over 100, for example.

"If we can identify the proteins that allow some species to live longer than others we could use this knowledge to improve human health and slow the aging process."

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Genetic study yields longevity clue

Anti-aging skin tips: how to keep facial skin looking young and healthy

Posted: at 2:02 am


Sleeping on one's side can increase the formation of fine lines and wrinkles as we age.

By Stephen M. Krant, MD, FACS

Most of us know that getting enough sleep is an important part of staying healthy and looking our best. However, a recent study has shown that how we sleep including the positions we prefer and even the type of pillowcase we use can have an impact on our overall appearance. Subsequently, sleep-related anti-aging skin tips may help prevent the formation and appearance of fine lines and wrinkles that betray advancing age.

According to a recent report from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, sleeping positions begin to impact the look and texture of the skin in people between the ages of 30 and 50. For those who sleep on their sides or use roughly textured pillowcases, the repeated pressure eventually begins to show up as sleep lines and wrinkles. Industry experts recommend sleeping on ones back, as opposed to ones side, to minimize the development of sleep lines; and in addition, proper skin care habits can help keep signs of aging at by.

As a professional plastic surgeon, I encourage all my patients to take good care of their skin, and to use preventative methods including daily sunscreen and sun protection, hydrating moisturizer, gentle cleansers and balanced nutrition to maintain skin elasticity and a youthful appearance. However, for those individuals contending with entrenched signs of aging, facial rejuvenation procedures utilizing laser resurfacing and cosmetic fillers can counteract past damage and help restore a more youthful look to the skin.

Preventative healthcare and facial rejuvenation treatment at our San Diego medical spa

Facial rejuvenation methods pose an ideal solution for patients looking to erase superficial signs of aging; and at SK Sanctuary, we combine the best in medical and plastic surgery technology and expertise with a luxurious spa environment to provide comprehensive and comfortable care. By marrying safety and precision for the safest and most effective results, we at SK Sanctuary offer patients peace of mind in conjunction with the latest Fraxel laser resurfacing, cosmetic plastic surgery, photodynamic therapy (ALA/BLU-U), IPL fotofacial treatments and Thermage skin tightening. Erase signs of skin damage, from sunspots, wrinkles and fine lines to acne scars and discoloration with the latest procedures and enjoy the personalized care of a board-certified plastic surgeon throughout the treatment process. To learn more about our San Diego medical spa at SK Sanctuary, or to schedule a complimentary consultation, contact us online today: http://www.sk-sanctuary.com.

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Anti-aging skin tips: how to keep facial skin looking young and healthy

Lifescript Launches New Diet And Fitness Section

Posted: March 29, 2012 at 5:14 am


MISSION VIEJO, Calif., March 28, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Lifescript.com, a women's health and wellness website headquartered in Mission Viejo, Calif., has just released a new Diet and Fitness section to help women eat right, exercise, and get to their healthiest weight. The section features exclusive celebrity workout videos, profiles of today's most popular diet and exercise plans, tips from nutrition experts and more.

"For women who want to lose weight and improve their health, we have a huge amount of information," says Laurie Berger, Lifescript Editor-in-Chief. "Our Diet and Fitness section is encouraging, informative, and has several fun, interactive tools that readers can depend on throughout their weight-loss journeys."

The new section includes step-by-step instructions for numerous exercise plans, searchable by body part, fitness goal, fitness level, equipment and health condition. The Diet and Fitness channel also features free fitness videos from celebrity trainer Adam Ernster who trains dozens of Hollywood stars such as Pussycat Doll Nicole Scherzinger, actress Jamie Lee Curtis, actor Ben Affleck and more. He invited Lifescript to his Beverly Hills "Bunker" to film tips on how he trains the stars, and all his videos are available on the site.

The new section also features news and descriptions of today's most popular diet plans to lose weight, with complete guidance from top nutritionists; as well as specialized exercise and nutrition advice for women with arthritis, diabetes, fibromyalgia, osteoporosis and other common conditions. There's even health and fitness advice from celebrities and famous chefs.

"Diet and Fitness" is one of five sections on Lifescript's rapidly growing health website, including "Health" (conditions), "Healthy Food" (a recipe collection) "Life" and "Soul." A Parenting section is scheduled for later in 2012.

ABOUT LIFESCRIPT: One of the fastest-growing online healthy living publishers, Lifescript.com (http://www.lifescript.com/) attracts 6.3 million unique visitors monthly and is the only site focusing exclusively on women's health. More than 7 million readers also subscribe to its six daily email newsletters. The company is headquartered in Mission Viejo, Calif., with additional offices in Beverly Hills and New York City.

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Lifescript Launches New Diet And Fitness Section

One Man, One Price: The Holistic Choices (THC)

Posted: at 5:14 am


The Holistic Choices, a medical-marijuana collective in Frelard, offers 25 strains of flowers, and you never have to wonder what the per-gram donation's going to be for any of them. Refreshingly, there's a straight-across-the-board $10 rate for everything in the house. Since some of the strains would almost certainly go for $15 at certain other collectives, this is a compelling reason to visit.Once I'd slipped my tamper-proof authorization form and Washington I.D. through a tiny slot at the bottom of a bulletproof glass window, owner Ric admitted me to a waiting area full of original works of art. I learned that all the paintings were by local artists, and were available for sale to interested patients; in so doing, The Holistic Choices helps support the local arts community.

THC (nice acronym, huh?) also has an exclusive license in the area to market Raydiant Titanium Vapor Engine hash-oil pipes. (Kits, including a cleaner, dabber, and extra parts, are available for a $100 donation.) The pipe features a "skillet" on which one does "dabs" of oil. I tried it, and it worked spectacularly well -- one good toke and you're off to the races. (Ric showed me the lab results for his in-house hash oil, which tested at 69 percent THC.)

I was even more impressed with The Holistic Choices once I learned it's a one-man operation. Owner Ric is the budtender and the receptionist. He's also pleasingly forthright about the condition of his medicine.

Besides the $10 grams, another great thing about THC is that it offers mix-and-match ounces for $250, whether or not all 28 grams are of one strain -- or, as Ric told me, "If I have 28 strains and you get a gram of each, it's still a $250 donation."

I selected one sativa-dominant hybrid, Super Silver Haze, and one indica, the mysterious W-7 (exclusive to The Holistic Choices). Super Silver Haze, a sensation on the cannabis scene about 15 years ago, has resinous and pungent flowers which combine a floral sweetness with skunky undertones. It offers a full-body stone and, it turns out, is one of those stress-reducer "musing" strains that lends itself to an afternoon of philosophical reflection.

W-7 is an unusual, light lime-green indica strain that you won't find anywhere else. As Ric promised, it was a strong pain-reliever, sedative, and sleep aid.

The Holistic Choices is in the bright green house at 4231 Sixth Ave. N.W. (between Northwest 42nd Street & Leary Way). It's open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and is closed on Sundays.

Steve Elliott edits Toke of the Town, Village Voice Media's site of cannabis news, views, rumor, and humor.

Toke Signals wants to review your dispensary. Email tokesignals@seattleweekly.com.

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One Man, One Price: The Holistic Choices (THC)

Television Show Longevity by Network

Posted: at 5:14 am


Previously, I explored how to find the Golden Age of television by analyzing IMDb data. After I wrote this, Gabriel Rossman, an assistant of sociology at UCLA, noted that it would be interesting to see what this chart would look like if broken down by broadcast network. With Rossmans help (he also had been playing with the IMDb data), I was able to examine the average television show length over time, in number of episodes, for the different networks. A chart with the results is below:

Clearly, in the past decade or so, the number of episodes per show has calmed down quite a bit. My hunch is that this is due to the larger number of shows that are currently being aired, of which many get canceled, lowering the mean number of episodes. But if you look further back in time, you can see that network show longevity has hints of being a zero-sum game. When one network has long-lived shows during a time period, such as ABC in the mid-1980s, another network might have a series of duds, such as NBC during the same time. This is reasonable, as there is only a finite amount of collective attention that we can lavish on television watching. Therefore if one network is doing well, it is not surprising that others do more poorly. Of course, this metric is far from perfect, but it can be used to test further hypotheses.

You can also notice other things in this chart, such as even historical events. For example Rossman has pointed out to me that there are hints of the 1988 writers strike, displayed as a precipitous drop in show length, though the 2007 strike is invisible.

As Ive already noted, we are in the middle of a great time for television. Maybe its also a great time for the applied mathematics of television as well.

Top image: urbanora/Flickr/CC-licensed

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Television Show Longevity by Network

Nutrition: America awakens to the sour the taste of 'pink slime'

Posted: March 28, 2012 at 3:20 pm


Take a cow. Chop it into pieces. Sell the edible bits to supermarkets, ship its hide to a handbag factory, send leftover bones and organs to a rendering plant. Now, what's left? In most of the developed world, the answer is simple: pet food. The sinew, gristle and fat regarded as unfit for human consumption are taken away by Mr Pedigree Chum and turned into something the salmonella-resistant stomach of your average Labrador will find vaguely digestible.

But in America, they do food differently. Here, in the land of GM corn, 26 per cent obesity and a government which classifies pizza as a "vegetable", scientists have discovered a way to turn bacteria-ridden scraps from the abattoir floor into a substance called "pink slime", which is then sold to unwitting consumers of hamburgers, tacos and other beef-based junk products. The process involves sticking bovine off-cuts in a heated centrifuge, so they separate into a mixture of liquid fat and a putty-coloured paste. That substance is then treated with ammonium hydroxide (a chemical used in household cleaners and home-made bombs) to kill off salmonella and e-coli. Then it's mixed with regular beef and hey presto! you have "all natural" mince.

In 2001, it became legal to sell "pink slime" in America. Today, more than half the ground beef sold in America contains the stuff. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA), which supposedly regulates the food industry, does not require it to be mentioned on ingredient lists. Since its provenance is a cow, they insist, you can call it "beef". If you think that's a bit rum, you're not alone. For years, US foodies have earnestly cited "pink slime" as exhibit A in the list of liberties taken by a rapacious food industry.

Not for nothing, they argue, has the stuff been banned in Europe, where mechanically-separated meat from cows and sheep has been prohibited since the era of BSE.

It took an Englishman, however, to turn their complaints into national outrage. A year ago, Jamie Oliver jollified the US version of his Food Revolution TV show by using a cow called Scarlet and a tumble dryer to demonstrate how something he calls "crap" became a staple of the American diet. Video of his stunt was uploaded to YouTube, and shared via social media. Opposition to "pink slime" slowly built.

In January, McDonalds announced the removal of "pink slime" from its burgers. So did Burger King and Taco Bell. This month, as the product became a burgeoning national talking point, several major supermarkets went slime-free. School districts were allowed to start banning it and dozens swiftly did. Yesterday, Beef Products Inc, pink slime's leading manufacturer, shut down three of its four plants, citing swiftly cratering demand. According to the American Meat Institute, 600 jobs could now be lost.

"It's a sad day for the families," claimed a spokesman. Though not, one must presume, for their diets.

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Nutrition: America awakens to the sour the taste of 'pink slime'

Interactive Family Care Promotes Nutrition and Weight Loss Services to Enhance Benefits of Chiropractic Care, Promote …

Posted: at 3:20 pm


RICHARDSON, TX--(Marketwire -03/28/12)- Interactive Family Clinic in Richardson, TX announced that the practice offers nutrition and weight loss services that are designed to naturally complement chiropractic care. Chiropractor Dr. Houssam Aljamal has been providing wellness care services to patients for nearly a decade. According to Dr. Aljamal, the right balance of nutrients can make a tremendous difference for patients' ability to successfully lose weight. The practice's weight loss program is designed to help reset patients' metabolism, so patients can successfully lose weight and keep the pounds off. The Richardson chiropractor also provides lifestyle advice, non-invasive laser surgery for weight loss, and chiropractic care for whole body wellness.

Richardson chiropractor Dr. Houssam Aljamal is raising awareness about the importance of nutrition counseling for successful weight loss and wellness care. Dr. Aljamal has over 10 years of experience providing patients with weight loss and nutrition counseling, in addition to chiropractic care for natural pain management.

"Our wellness center is committed to identifying and correcting underlying causes for chronic pain and disease," said Dr. Houssam Aljamal. "When a patient suffers from neck pain or back pain, we work to identify the underlying misalignment causing this pain. Here at our wellness center, we apply this same principle to successful weight loss. Each patient has individual nutrient needs. We identify these needs and work with patients to reset their metabolism, turning their bodies into fat burning machines."

Dr. Aljamal emphasized that the wellness center's weight loss program is not a "diet," but a roadmap to whole body wellness care. "Our program is not a 'quick fix' or a fad diet, but a series of permanent lifestyle changes," said Dr. Aljamal. "That's why our weight loss services are so successful -- we help patients reset their bodies and change their emotional response to food. With the right nutrients, food becomes fuel for the body, rather than a source of comfort or anxiety."

According to the Richardson chiropractor, nutrition counseling can also help patients who suffer from chronic back pain and headache. Some foods can "trigger" headaches or exacerbate existing pain. By switching to a low-inflammation diet high in antioxidants, patients may be able to use their diet to help control and reduce the occurrence of chronic pain.

"Antioxidants help combat chronic inflammation, which is a contributing factor for chronic back pain," said Dr. Aljamal. "We frequently recommend that our patients receive a combination of chiropractic adjustments and nutrition counseling. Together, these complementary treatments help reduce pain and enhance well-being."

In addition to nutrition counseling, the practice also provides non-invasive laser surgery for weight loss. This procedure is designed to remove fat and contours from the body without the cost or potential health complications of invasive procedures like liposuction.

"We've had tremendous success helping patients lose weight and reshape their bodies with body contouring procedures," said Dr. Aljamal. "Even with substantial natural weight loss, there are always pockets of stubborn fat on the body. Our body contouring procedures target these pockets for a slim, health overall appearance."

Interactive Family Clinic provides natural healing benefits for patients in Richardson and the surrounding areas of Garland, Carrollton, and University Park. Prospective patients may learn more about the nutrition and weight loss services offered by Interactive Family Clinic may visit the website at http://www.backtomyhealth.com.

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