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Vitalik Buterin Wants to Rid Humanity of Aging, David Snsteb and Justin Sun Join In – U.Today

Posted: March 31, 2020 at 10:45 pm


Yuri Molchan

Major crypto platform founders support anti-aging research, saying that a bigger population could live even with finite resources

Ethereums Vitalik Buterin, IOTAs David Snsteb and Trons Justin Sun are discussing anti-aging research andsupporting it. Buterin admittedthat thisidea is weird for many peoplethese days, though, he also calledaging a humanitarian disaster.

In the course of a recent discussion of weird ideas on Twitter, the co-founder of Ethereum, Vitalik Buterin, suggested discussing anti-aging research, calling aging a humanitarian disaster.

He stated that every two years, as many people die from aging as didin World War 2. Additionally, he saidthat theissue burdens social systems and families. Buterin hopes that soon scientists will be able to significantly extend the human life span.

When asked about the planet getting overpopulated and the issue of the resources coming to an end, the Ethereum co-founder stated:

On average a new person contributes more to the resources available to existing humans than they deplete. (This is due to their productive labor, scientific research, the change they become the next Norman Borlaug, etc...)

We are nowhere near any theoretical bounds on our ability to use those resources. Our efficiency in using limited resources has increased by orders of magnitude in the last two centuries, and can rise orders of magnitude more.

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IOTA founder, David Snsteb, has responded, saying that in 2020 the discussion on life-extension measures should not at all be considered a weird idea, unlike it was fifteen years ago, in 2005.

Now, Snsteb tweeted, this should be the universal common sense position.

The Tron founder Justin Sun briefly joinedthe discussion.

In an exclusive interview with U.Today, the IOHK CEO and Cardano founder Charles Hoskinson also shared his take on the subject of anti-aging.

While describing possible trends of the future, he mentioned a largely growing market of life extension products and services. He recalled thewell-known example of a jellyfish that can regenerate and thus live forever.

So there's probably going to be a considerable amount of improvement in regenerative biology and an improvement in a human lifespan extension and new therapies and medicines to keep us healthy into our deep old age. So then what does that mean? It means you have a human race that doesn't recycle every 80 years. They may last a lot longer.

He also suggestedthat as the anti-aging trend likely gets wider and stronger, there will be fewer religious people accepting death as a natural part of human life.

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Vitalik Buterin Wants to Rid Humanity of Aging, David Snsteb and Justin Sun Join In - U.Today

Best of Santa Cruz County 2020: Health and Recreation – goodtimes.sc

Posted: at 10:45 pm


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Find out what readers voted as the best health and recreation.

Andrew Steingrube

Andrew Steingrube

Denize Gallardo

200 7th Ave., Santa Cruz,

476-9424, fivebranches.edu

1001 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz,

427-2580, bicycletrip.com

533 Ocean St., Santa Cruz, 515-4114;

3600 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, 471-8562, kindpeoples.org

533 Ocean St., Santa Cruz, 515-4114;

3600 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz,

471-8562, kindpeoples.org

533 Ocean St., Santa Cruz, 515-4114;

3600 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz,

471-8562, kindpeoples.org

Duncan McCollum, DC 3555 Clares St., Capitola, 459-9990, mccollumfamilychiropractic.com

1619 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz,

600-7867, seabrightcrossfit.com

525 Center St., Santa Cruz, 426-1343, newstreetdentalsantacruz.com

740 Front St., Santa Cruz, 465-9088, santacruzintegrativemedicine.com

740 Front St. #130, Santa Cruz, 465-9088, drshunney.com

1543 Pacific Ave. #215, Santa Cruz, 295-6233, thenook.us

401 Upper Park Rd., Santa Cruz,423-7214, delaveagagolf.com

113 Lincoln St., Santa Cruz, 423-3764;

1200 17th Ave. #108, Santa Cruz, 464-3764;

2929 Mission St. Extension, Santa Cruz, 466-3764;

269 Mount Hermon Rd., Scotts Valley, 430-9200, toadalfitness.com

4626 Soquel Drive, Soquel,475-9676, sanfordskarate.com

501 Mission St., Ste. 5, Santa Cruz,(785) 691-6639, shawnaristic.com

3311 Mission Dr., Santa Cruz,475-4315, ultraderm.com

2907 Chanticleer Ave., Santa Cruz,477-2375, sutterhealth.org/pamf

130 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz, 359-5335, nourishsantacruz.com

1773 Dominican Way, Santa Cruz, 475-5500, joinerortho.com

1440 41st Ave., Capitola, 479-1501;

136 River St., Santa Cruz, 423-9555,

theoutdoorworld.com

[emailprotected], fuelphitness.com

1266 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, 423-8632,staffoflifemarket.com

121 Walnut Ave, Santa Cruz, 458-4125, agilemonkey.net

7960 Soquel Drive Suite I, Aptos,662-0886, fleetfeetaptos.com

790 Mariner Park Way, Dock FF, Santa Cruz, 423-1213, chardonnay.com

508 Woodland Way, Santa Cruz

1240 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz,469-0904, billswheels.com

1408 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, 462-6800, helmofsunvalley.com

911 Capitola Ave., Capitola, 462-4422, caressdayspa.com

417 Cedar St., Santa Cruz, 458-9355, wellwithinspa.com

4770 Soquel Drive, Soquel,475-1988, playitagainsports-soquel.com

2214 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz,464-7467, supshacksantacruz.com

849 Almar Ave., Box 192, Santa Cruz, 423-0928, richardschmidt.com

110 Cooper St. #100D, Santa Cruz, 469-4377;

400 Beach St., Santa Cruz, 459-9230;

1115 41st Ave., Capitola, 475-4151, oneill.com

303 Potrero St. #15, Santa Cruz, 458-3648, asudoit.com

nourishsantacruz.com

1010 Center St., Santa Cruz, 325-2620, lumayoga.com

Andrew has been writing for most of his life and has been published in multiple forms. He has a B.S. in Psychology from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and an M.S. in Nutritional Science from California State University at Chico. His interests, journalistic and otherwise, are diverse. But like pretty much everyone else he loves music and sports as well as food, water, and shelter. His favorite animal is the Pacific green sea turtle and his favorite board game is Stratego. He is also prone to over-thinking and is glad that this paragraph will soon be over so that he can stop trying to describe himself within it.

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Best of Santa Cruz County 2020: Health and Recreation - goodtimes.sc

Female Anti-Aging Facial Mask Market Report by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application Forecast 2019 2025 – Skyline Gazette

Posted: at 10:45 pm


A new research study has been presented by UpMarketResearch.com offering a comprehensive analysis on the Global Female Anti-Aging Facial Mask Market where user can benefit from the complete market research report with all the required useful information about this market. The report discusses all major market aspects with expert opinion on current market status along with historic data. This market report is a detailed study on the growth, investment opportunities, market statistics, growing competition analysis, major key players, industry facts, important figures, sales, prices, revenues, gross margins, market shares, business strategies, top regions, demand, and developments.

The Female Anti-Aging Facial Mask Market report provides a detailed analysis of the global market size, regional and country-level market size, segment growth, market share, competitive landscape, sales analysis, impact of domestic and global market players, value chain optimization, trade regulations, recent developments, opportunity analysis, strategic market growth analysis, product launches, and technological innovations.

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Major Players Covered in this Report are: Shanghai ChicmaxMy Beauty DiaryDR.JOU BiotechYujiahuiHerboristTHE FACE SHOPSK-IIChoiskycnL&PEstee LauderPechoinYalgetAvonKoseOlayShiseidoLorealInoherbCel-dermaProya

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The report offers an in-depth assessment of the growth and other aspects of the market in key countries including the US, Canada, Mexico, Germany, France, the UK, Russia, Italy, China, Japan, South Korea, India, Australia, Brazil, and Saudi Arabia. The competitive landscape chapter of the global market report provides key information about market players such as company overview, total revenue (financials), market potential, global presence, Female Anti-Aging Facial Mask sales and revenue generated, market share, prices, production sites and facilities, products offered, and strategies adopted. This study provides Female Anti-Aging Facial Mask sales, revenue, and market share for each player covered in this report for a period between 2016 and 2020.

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Table of Contents1. Executive Summary2. Assumptions and Acronyms Used3. Research Methodology4. Market Overview5. Global Market Analysis and Forecast, by Types6. Global Market Analysis and Forecast, by Applications7. Global Market Analysis and Forecast, by Regions8. North America Market Analysis and Forecast9. Latin America Market Analysis and Forecast10. Europe Market Analysis and Forecast11. Asia Pacific Market Analysis and Forecast12. Middle East & Africa Market Analysis and Forecast13. Competition Landscape

About UpMarketResearch:Up Market Research (https://www.upmarketresearch.com) is a leading distributor of market research report with more than 800+ global clients. As a market research company, we take pride in equipping our clients with insights and data that holds the power to truly make a difference to their business. Our mission is singular and well-defined we want to help our clients envisage their business environment so that they are able to make informed, strategic and therefore successful decisions for themselves.

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Female Anti-Aging Facial Mask Market Report by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application Forecast 2019 2025 - Skyline Gazette

Quinn on Nutrition: Genes that fit | Nutrition | gmtoday.com – Greater Milwaukee Today

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Look in the mirror. A lot of what you see came from your parents, grandparents and on down the line. And a lot of what goes on inside our bodies including our risk for disease and how we utilize nutrients comes from inherited traits as well.

For example, my dad developed type 2 diabetes in his later years. We know there is a genetic link to this disease and half of my genetic code is from my dad. So I am at a higher risk for developing diabetes, too.

Risk is not always reality, however. As it was explained to me several years ago, Genetics loads the gun and lifestyle (eating, exercise and other habits) pulls the trigger.

Yet its even more complicated than that. We are just beginning to understand that specific hereditary genes influence how our bodies use certain nutrients to impact our health. Individuals who carry one specific gene related to the metabolism of vitamin D, for example, were found to have more health benefits from a high protein diet for weight loss than people who do not carry this particular gene.

Other research shows that people like myself who carry a specific gene that makes us susceptible to type 2 diabetes respond favorably to a higher intake of dietary fiber to reduce that risk. Fascinating.

Theres still a lot to learn, however. Genetic experts report that we understand the various workings of only about 10% of the genes that have thus far been identified.

What about companies that claim to tell us what to eat based on our genetic profile from a saliva test? Here are some things to be aware of:

Results may vary. Different labs have different ways of identifying specific genes. And our understanding of genetic codes is still limited. Use the results as one piece of your health puzzle.

Go through a credible company. Their recommendations should be based on evidence-based research and they should direct you to those studies. And their lab should be CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments) certified, which means they are regulated for quality lab testing.

Beware of companies that claim to detect food allergies through DNA. Although some allergies are genetic, they are genetic in the immune system rather than in the actual DNA, according to genetic researcher Sherry Zang, PhD. Her company, GenoPalate, states there are no genetic assays for detecting food allergies through DNA.

Dont look for magic answers. How our diets and nutrient intake respond to our genetic code is complicated. Genetic analyses cannot guarantee instant weight loss or that youll win the lottery. On the other hand, a reliable company may give you some insight into how a healthful diet fits your genes.

I took the invitation to test my own DNA and am still waiting on results. Stay tuned

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Quinn on Nutrition: Genes that fit | Nutrition | gmtoday.com - Greater Milwaukee Today

Food and nutrition benefits to increase for NC families – The Fayetteville Observer

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Melody Brown-Peyton Staff writer @MelodyBrownPey1

TuesdayMar31,2020at6:17PM

This content is being provided for free as a public service to our readers during the coronavirus outbreak. Please support local journalism by subscribing to The Fayetteville Observer at https://www.fayobserver.com/subscribenow.

North Carolina families who receive aid from the governments food and nutrition program will get a temporarily increase in benefits for the months of March and April, according to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.

The increase in benefits will assist families across the state as the need for food has drastically increased during the coronavirus pandemic, said David Locklear, deputy director of economic and families services, in a news release.

The increase will also help with social distancing while helping families decrease the number of trips to the grocery store, Locklear said.

Locklear said the increase will be based on the household size if the family is not already receiving the maximum allotment. For example, he said, a senior citizen who gets a minimum of $16 a month in aid would be supplemented to the maximum allotment of $178 monthly.

Locklear estimated that 360,000 families will benefit from the increase in aid.

DHHS received approval to implement the increase from the U.S. Department of Agriculture on March 27, according to the news release.

Staff writer Melody Brown-Peyton can be reached at mbrownpeyton@fayobserver.com or 910-486-3568

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Food and nutrition benefits to increase for NC families - The Fayetteville Observer

Heres why nutrition science is always contradicting itself – The Takeout

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Photo: JGI/Jamie Grill (Getty Images)

Follow food research long enough and youll start to feel insane. At least thats how I feel, and that seems to be how medical journalist Clare Wilson feels, too. Her recent piece in the South China Morning Post magazine called Food science: should we believe anything we read about nutrition? dissects the methodology of nutritional research and how the media picks and chooses food-related stories to publish. Itll either make you question everything or, if youre like me, affirm your long-held belief that new/terrifying research on heretofore healthy foods should be mostly ignored. We highly recommend the read.

Wilson opens with eggs, the perfect example of our collective seesaw in popular food science. Eggs were always a breakfast staple until the 1960s, when we discovered that cholesterol is bad for us. Eggs are therefore bad; R.I.P. eggs. Then, in the 80s, we found out that cholesterol in food doesnt really affect our heart health. Eggs are back onhooray for eggs! But wait, no. In 2019, more research arose that found the cholesterol in eggs is, once again, ravaging our bodies.

According to Wilson, there are tons of problems in diet research, one of which is that its pretty much impossible to have a control group. Nutritionists cant ask people to change their diet for years on end (or know that these participants have stuck to it). So instead, they have subjects complete food diaries and try to draw conclusions from that. But there are so many other factorsclass and income level being huge onesthat impact our health beyond what we eat. Money and diet are so intertwined that its difficult for researchers to tease them apart. For example, Wilson writes, even if blueberries do not affect heart attack rates, those who eat more of them will have fewer heart attacks, simply because eating blueberries is a badge of middle-class prosperity.

Another big factor is publication bias. Food journalists (like myself) are so much more interested in studies that find a link between two things. Hot sauce gives you cancer is a more gripping headline than, say, Diet is a complicated thing that mostly has to do with privilege and access but maybe try to eat balanced meals. Even within the research community itself, similar biases exist. There have been so many studies at this point that anyone can just cherry-pick whichever studies fit their theories. Plus, virtually no diet studies can apply to a persons entire life. Its an imperfect system, to say the least.

G/O Media may get a commission

Anyway, Im blathering, but please read this piece, then go ahead and enjoy some delicious, cholesterol-ridden eggs.

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Heres why nutrition science is always contradicting itself - The Takeout

MDE to request federal waiver for Child Nutrition Programs – WNEM Saginaw

Posted: at 10:44 pm


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MDE to request federal waiver for Child Nutrition Programs - WNEM Saginaw

Keep nutrition in mind during the pandemic – Myguidon

Posted: at 10:44 pm


By Danielle Carter and 1st Lt. Dana Larsen

Meal planning is very important when trying to prevent having to make multiple visits to the grocery store. Keeping whole meals in mind rather than just ingredients also prevents wasted food.

The following are food items to consider having on hand when staying at home for days or weeks on end:

Protein: canned salmon, chicken or tuna, beef jerky, dried or canned beans/lentils, nuts or nut butters, frozen meat and fish.

Vegetables: low-sodium canned or frozen veggies.

Fruit: canned in light syrup or 100 percent juice, or frozen no-sugar added fruits limit fruit juice.

Starch: whole-grain pasta, brown rice, whole-wheat crackers, granola bars, whole-wheat bread.

Dairy: ultra-heat treated milk (shelf stable), infant formula, powdered instant breakfast, fortified powdered whole milk (infants/toddlers), powdered milk.

Canned, frozen and dried goods have a longer shelf life than fresh produce these products are generally cheaper as well. However, high-sodium processed foods such as ramen noodle packages may exacerbate high blood pressure.

Special consideration is needed for people with health conditions such as diabetes. Make sure emergency kits are stocked with essentials such as testing strips and products with simple sugars, such as fruit juice or soda in case blood sugar drops.

Families experiencing financial hardship may contact the Waynesville R-VI School District, which is offering meal-delivery service on special weekday food distribution bus routes through April 3. Breakfast and lunch are delivered together. Anyone 18 years old and younger, and disabled adults, may receive free meals at the bus stops. There are no income guidelines for free meals. Food pickups are also available from 7:45 to 9:30 a.m. at Wood and Partridge elementary schools on post, Freedom Elementary in Saint Robert, or Waynesville High School. Call 573.842.2099 for more information.

Proper nutrition, hydration, sleep and activity have been proven to improve overall health and well-being. Anyone with questions or concerns about maintaining a healthy diet should call the Nutrition Care Division at 573.596.1762 to schedule a virtual appointment with a registered dietitian.

(Editors note: This article was provided by the General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital Nutrition Care Division.)

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Keep nutrition in mind during the pandemic - Myguidon

Mark Feinglos, former chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition, has died – Duke Today

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Mary Klotman, MD, Dean of the School of Medicine shared the following announcement with the School of Medicine faculty:

It is with great sadness that we write to inform you that Mark Feinglos, MD, passed away on March 14, 2020.

Read his obituary and remembrances from his family.

Dr. Feinglos was a Professor of Medicine and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Pathology. Feinglos served as chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition in the Department of Medicine from 2000 to 2012. Under his leadership, faculty in the division doubled in numbers and the fellowship program became one of the strongest in the country.

Feinglos called Duke home for nearly 50 years. He completed his residency and fellowship here after receiving his medical degree from McGill University in Canada and he joined the Duke faculty in 1978.

He was a highly respected and accomplished physician-scientist. Feinglos was principal investigator (PI) or co-PI on multiple grants and author on more than 150 publications. His research interests focused on etiology and the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. He studied the role of the autonomic nervous system in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in humans and the mechanism of action of dietary therapy and a variety of pharmacological agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Feinglos was also a mineral collector specializing in Tsumeb minerals, found at the Tsumeb mine in Namibia. He was the first to discover a mineral, which is now named feinglosite in his honor.

Please join us in extending our deepest condolences to Dr. Feinglos family and friends.

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Mark Feinglos, former chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition, has died - Duke Today

St. Marys native to open nutrition business on Erie Avenue in May – The Courier-Express

Posted: at 10:44 pm


ST. MARYS A St. Marys native who expects to open a full-scale nutrition business on Erie Avenue in May recently offered around 500 samples to the community.

Betsy Dutoit moved to Louisiana in 2013, working as a wildlife biologist on a white-tailed deer research project. She was also a biologist for the National Wild Turkey Federation.

Although Dutoit doesnt have a background in nutrition, she became passionate about getting into shape after she had children, she says. While working in Louisiana, Dutoit found a nutrition club that offered meal-replacement shakes and sugar-free teas.

I was working out at the gym three days a week, and getting incredible results, she said.

Dutoit, who is a member of Anytime Fitness in St. Marys, said she has been impressed by the recent interest in health and wellness in the area, mentioning the dedication of places like Physical Industry Training (PIT) on South St. Marys Street and New Horizon Healthy Foods on Brusselles Street.

Opening a nutrition club seemed like a great fit for the area, Dutoit said. I work with a team of more than 300 nutrition clubs, and we are always training on our products and how to better serve the public.

Dutoit was welcoming anyone interested in a sample or business opportunity to her fathers house on Linwood Avenue in mid March, offering shakes and teas with interesting names and flavors, such as Hocus Pocus, Black Pearl or Cinnamon Toast Crunch.

I wanted to spend a week here hosting a sampling event, so that I could scout a location, find potential partners and employees and obviously share these amazing products with all my friends and family, she said. It really gives me a chance to gauge the interest.

SMN will have a large array of products, including classic meal-replacement shakes and energizing, sugar-free teas, as well as a line for muscle recovery, a beauty tea line with collagen for hair, skin and nails, wellness evaluations, meal planning and weight-loss programs.

For more information, visit Saint Marys Nutrition on Facebook.

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St. Marys native to open nutrition business on Erie Avenue in May - The Courier-Express

Wild Turtle Nutrition advocates for health and wellness – Cherokee Phoenix

Posted: at 10:44 pm


BYLINDSEY BARK Reporter

03/30/2020 01:00 PM

Herbalife is a global nutrition company that promotes healthy lifestyles in people by selling science-backed products that help people get the right balance of healthy nutrition, according to company.herbalife.com.

Brad said he used to work in the oil industry and did not have a healthy diet while on the job, which mostly consisted of fast foods and energy drinks. After Kay convinced him to try Herbalife, he said he has been hooked since.

But what got me was we did a health evaluation and she showed me my metabolic ageI basically had the body of a 60-year-old in a 35-year-old body, he said. But thats what spurred me. Thats what made me want to start feeling better, eating better. I cant eat McDonalds anymore. I used to eat there two or three times a week.

Wild Turtle sells Herbalife shakes, teas and other products; provides health and wellness evaluations; and promotes ways for people to live healthy.

Were here trying to help people be healthy, Kay said. We will do health evaluations. We do measurements. We will weigh you. Well help you with meal planningthat way that person has options, especially if they dont like certain things or they dont eat certain things. It doesnt even have to involve our products. Yes, we would love for them to use our products, but we would rather them go home and be able to be healthy than not to be healthy. So its really what were doing this for.

Their biggest sellers are energy teas of multiple flavors and meal replacement shakes.

The teas are mixtures of green and black teas, flavors and natural sweeteners.

For example, the Aquaman tea is a green and black tea known to be thermo-genic by raising a persons core temperature to help them burn calories, Brad said.

The tea itself might have 20 calories, but youre going to burn close to 80 just by drinking it. It also depends on how active you are as well, he said.

The meal replacement shakes, not meant to totally replace food, have at least 200 calories, 24 grams of proteins and 21 vitamins and minerals. Most of the shakes they offer, except two, are gluten-free and plant-based.

Youre going to get close to half of your daily-required vitamins and minerals in one shake, Kay said. If youre very deficient on a lot of things, just adding one shake to your dietits going to help out a lot.

The teas and shakes can also have add-ins such as caffeine, pre-workouts and fight fighters as well as multivitamins and protein bars. A basic tea is $3.50 and a basic shake is $7.50, before add-ins.

The Terrapins said a goal is to work more with the tribe in the future and promote healthy living through different programs.

Honestly, our business is 90 to 95 percent Cherokee Nation, she said. Were blessed. They have blessed us so much being out here. Weve made a lot of great friends, people that come and see us daily. We know them by first names. We genuinely care about our customers. Theyre no longer our customers; theyre our friends and family.

Wild Turtle is open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. Its located at 17632 Muskogee Ave.

For information, visit Wild Turtle Nutrition on Facebook or Instagram.

lindsey-bark@cherokee.org 918-772-4223

Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated magna cum laude from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelors degree in mass communication, emphasizing ...

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Wild Turtle Nutrition advocates for health and wellness - Cherokee Phoenix

Local nonprofit offering virtual classes on gardening, nutrition – Evening News and Tribune

Posted: at 10:44 pm


NEW ALBANY The New Albany-based nonprofit Let Us Learn Inc. was building momentum, and then the coronavirus pandemic hit, halting its in-person programming.

But thats not stopping the organization from offering weekly lessons to local children.

Let Us Learn, a volunteer-run nonprofit focused on teaching kids to grow their own food and eat nutritious meals, has introduced virtual programming to adapt to closures caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The nonprofit has partnered with local schools, including Fairmont, S. Ellen Jones and Green Valley elementary schools.

The nonprofit built a community garden three years ago at Fairmont, and shortly before the school closures were announced, it built another at S. Ellen Jones. The organization was preparing to build a garden at Green Valley later this spring before the school closures were announced, according to Let Us Learn Executive Director Gina Brown. Several months ago, the organization received an $18,000 grant from the Caesars Foundation to expand its reach in the community.

When everything suddenly slowed down due to the pandemic, Brown needed to find a creative way to continue programming.

Our program mainly focuses on youth in our Title I schools, and we are in three schools, and for us to continue, we have to, like everybody else, think outside of the box, she said.

Let Us Learn is now offering live events and videos for families to watch and/or participate in from their own homes. Brown is collaborating with Floyd County Purdue Extension Educator Gina Anderson to develop a live-streamed program called Two Ginas in the Garden.

The two Ginas have collaborated in the past for a school program called Growing Dinner From the Ground Up, in which Anderson would teach agricultural lessons and Brown, who has a background as a chef, would teach kids about food and nutrition. The virtual lesson will be an extension of that program, according to Brown.

Were trying to somehow continue our Growing Dinner From the Ground Up class, Brown said. Wed like to do like a split screen where [Anderson] would be in her garden, and I would be at home or in the Fairmont Elementary garden. She might teach composting or how to grow carrots, and I would make carrot pesto.

Anderson said the classes will be focused on things kids can do from home most people have some kind of container they can use to plant, and she looks forward to teaching gardening lessons from her own garden.

Even though were supposed to be staying in place, there are tons of things we can still do outside that can make people feel better, she said. Its all about going out and getting that sunshine.

The gardening program is just one of the offerings. There will be five to six virtual programs a week, including readings of garden stories, cooking lessons and arts & crafts, according to Brown. Grantline Garden Center is helping the nonprofit present these programs with a big donation of garden-related arts & craft supplies, which students will use during virtual lessons with members of Let Us Learn.

On Friday, Brown set up a Zoom meeting with local families to teach students how to make decorated lightning bug jars from some of the donated craft materials, which parents picked up from Let Us Learns New Albany office to take home.

Anderson said they are still working out the details of the Two Ginas in the Garden program, and one of the challenges is interacting with a virtual audience. Through the videos, she hopes to reach people who hadnt previously known about the programs offered by Let Us Learn or the Purdue Extension.

New Albany resident Melissa Blairs 8-year-old son, Vaughan, has loved the Let Us Learn programming at Fairmont, and it inspired him to start gardening at home.

Blair, who also has volunteered with the nonprofit, appreciates Let Us Learns cooking lessons, introducing the family to new recipes and how to prepare meals on a budget.

The coronavirus pandemic has been a stressful time for the family as they stay at home and are careful to stay away from immune-compromised family members. Fridays craft lesson with Let Us Learn was the first time her son has seen his friends since all the closures started, she said.

To not be able to see the other mothers, who are my friends, and for him to not be able to see any of his friends, its hard, Blair said. We have to fill every single day with different stuff, and weve found some stuff online for him to do, but for him to do something with people he knows and is comfortable with, thats great.

New Albany resident Megan Klingman also has worked as a volunteer for the nonprofit. She said the programs have created a sense of community for both her and her 8-year-old daughter, Olivia. The virtual programming creates a sense of normalcy, she said.

It gives her a connection with her friends and with Gina [Brown], she said. Shes excited about it, and she still gets to learn.

To learn more about the virtual programs, visit Let Us Learn Inc. on Facebook.

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Local nonprofit offering virtual classes on gardening, nutrition - Evening News and Tribune

Nutrition: There’s a limit to what you learn from genes – Duluth News Tribune

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Look in the mirror. A lot of what you see came from your parents, grandparents and on down the line. And a lot of what goes on inside our bodies including our risk for disease and how we utilize nutrients comes from inherited traits as well.

For example, my dad developed type 2 diabetes in his later years. We know there is a genetic link to this disease and half of my genetic code is from my dad. So I am at a higher risk for developing diabetes, too.

Risk is not always reality, however. As it was explained to me several years ago, Genetics loads the gun and lifestyle (eating, exercise and other habits) pulls the trigger.

Yet its even more complicated than that. We are just beginning to understand that specific hereditary genes influence how our bodies use certain nutrients to impact our health. Individuals who carry one specific gene related to the metabolism of vitamin D, for example, were found to have more health benefits from a high protein diet for weight loss than people who do not carry this particular gene.

Other research shows that people like myself who carry a specific gene that makes us susceptible to type 2 diabetes respond favorably to a higher intake of dietary fiber to reduce that risk. Fascinating.

Theres still a lot to learn, however. Genetic experts report that we understand the various workings of only about 10% of the genes that have thus far been identified.

What about companies that claim to tell us what to eat based on our genetic profile from a saliva test? Here are some things to be aware of:

Results may vary. Different labs have different ways of identifying specific genes. And our understanding of genetic codes is still limited. Use the results as one piece of your health puzzle.

Go through a credible company. Their recommendations should be based on evidence-based research and they should direct you to those studies. And their lab should be CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments) certified, which means they are regulated for quality lab testing.

Beware of companies that claim to detect food allergies through DNA. Although some allergies are genetic, they are genetic in the immune system rather than in the actual DNA, according to genetic researcher Sherry Zang, PhD. Her company, GenoPalate, states there are no genetic assays for detecting food allergies through DNA.

Dont look for magic answers. How our diets and nutrient intake respond to our genetic code is complicated. Genetic analyses cannot guarantee instant weight loss or that youll win the lottery. On the other hand, a reliable company may give you some insight into how a healthful diet fits your genes.

I took the invitation to test my own DNA and am still waiting on results. Stay tuned.

Barbara Quinn is a registered dietitian nutritionist affiliated with the Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula

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NUTRITION: Greek-inspired olive oil cookies are ideal comfort food – Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Cooking has a way of grounding a person in uncertain times, and baking can be especially comforting. That soothing effect is not just in the eating; it's built into the baking process - the in-the-moment focus needed to measure ingredients, the tactile pleasure of working with the batter, and the homey fragrance that fills the kitchen as the oven does its part.

These scrumptious cookies -- my take on the Greek version, Kolourakia Lathiou -- offer all of those comforts, in a more healthful way than most other baked goods because they are very lightly sweetened, made with whole wheat flour and contain olive oil rather than butter.

The oil gives the cookie a delightfully crunchy, crumbly texture and subtle savoriness. Seasoned with orange essence, cinnamon, cloves and a shot of brandy, the cookies' flavor is warm and fragrant, and a coating of nutty sesame seeds delivers extra substance as well as a festive flair. With so little sugar in them, they could be considered more of a decadent biscuit that a cookie, but if you prefer something a bit sweeter, increase the sugar to half a cup.

Besides enjoying making these, you'll be glad to have them alongside a mug of coffee or tea, to take the edge off the afternoon.

Ellie Krieger is a registered dietitian who hosts public televisions Ellies Real Good Food. She blogs and offers a weekly newsletter at elliekrieger.com.

GREEK-STYLE OLIVE OIL SESAME COOKIES

These scrumptious cookies -- a take on the Greek cookie, Kolourakia Lathiou -- are made with olive oil instead of butter, which not only makes them better for you, but it also gives them a delightfully crunchy, crumbly texture and subtle savoriness. Seasoned with orange essence, cinnamon, cloves and a shot of brandy, their flavor is warm and fragrant. A coating of nutty sesame seeds delivers extra substance as well as a festive flair. With so little added sugar in them, they could be considered more of a decadent biscuit that a cookie; if you prefer something a bit sweeter, increase the sugar to 1/2 cup (100 grams).

Storage Notes: Store the cookies at room temperature in an airtight container for up to 1 week or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Ingredients

1 orange

1/2 cup (120 milliliters) olive oil (one that is light in flavor and color)

1/3 cup (67 grams) granulated sugar

2 tablespoons brandy or cognac

2 1/2 cups (300 grams) whole-wheat pastry flour (or 1 1/2 cups/188 grams) all-purpose flour and 1 cup/125 grams) whole-wheat flour)

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1/3 cup (50 grams) white sesame seeds

Steps

Position the rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

Using a fine grater, zest the orange until you have 1 teaspoon of zest. Squeeze 1/3 cup (80 milliliters) of juice from the orange into a large bowl. Reserve the rest of the fruit for another use.

To the bowl, add the oil, sugar, brandy and zest, and whisk until the sugar is dissolved.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, cloves and baking soda. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ones in several batches, stirring at first with a spoon or spatula to incorporate. When the dough becomes difficult to stir with the last additions of dry ingredients, use your hands to knead the dough to incorporate. Cover the bowl and let the dough rest for 10 minutes.

Spread the sesame seeds on a wide plate. Roll the dough into heaping tablespoon-size balls. Roll each ball in the sesame seeds, pressing a bit with your fingers so that they adhere, then place on the baking sheet and flatten slightly with the palm of your hand so that each disk is about 2 inches in diameter and 1/4-inch high. Place the balls about 1 inch apart on the baking sheet; they will not spread much.

Bake for about 30 minutes, until golden and crunchy; then transfer to a wire rack. The cookies will crisp further as they cool. Serve at room temperature.

Calories: 120;

Total Fat: 7 g;

Saturated Fat: 1 g;

Cholesterol: 0 mg;

Sodium: 25 mg;

Carbohydrates: 12 g;

Dietary Fiber: 2 g;

Sugars: 1 g;

Protein: 3 g.

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Openfit Offers a Free Trial to Fitness and Nutrition App – Campus Rec Magazine

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Openfit is a comprehensive health and wellness digital streaming platform that offers live and on-demand fitness classes, and integrated nutrition planning and tracking. Over the past weeks, weve heard about the many colleges and universities facing canceled classes and campus shutdowns. If your community has been affected by the current health crisis, Openfit would like to help.

They can stream hundreds of workouts even live, trainer-led fitness classes, including barre, Pilates, cardio, yoga and running. Some workouts are asshortas 10 minutes, and most need little or no equipment to do.Itsa simpleway to stay active and healthy withouthavingto leave home. The app even makes it easier to eat right, with personalized meal planning and tracking tools.

To learn moreabout the Openfit platform, go to openfit.com, and if youd like to share this opportunity with students or staff,heres the information you needto provide:

Limited time offer

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Veterans lose social outlet with closing but efforts to provide nutrition still ongoing – Statesville Record & Landmark

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Richards Coffee Shop, like many businesses across the state, shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The shuttered doors mean more than just one less place to get a cup of coffee in Mooresville. For many veterans, the coffee shop is a link to others, said Executive Director John Hedley.

This is lifeblood for some folks, Hedley said.

He said about a half-dozen to a dozen veterans usually stop by the shop every day. The coffee is not the main draw, Hedley said. Instead, it provides a chance for social interaction, and the fact that it is no longer available is one of Hedleys main concerns as the closure stretches into its third week.

They feel kind of lost if they cant get in there and share experiences, he said. For many, he said, the hours they spend at Richards are the only social interaction they have because they may be widowed or have little family in the area.

Ralph Dagenhart, a Vietnam veteran who helps out at Richards, said some veterans who come there regularly are using social media to maintain some contact. They get on Facebook and check in with one another, he said.

While the shutdown of Richards means the loss of a social outlet, those who work to feed veterans in need are continuing on, although with many safeguards.

The Rev. Frank Turner, pastor of First Church of the Nazarene, said the Piedmont Veterans Assistance Council program that offers food to veterans in need is still providing those meals. Turner said the church, one of four sites across the county, is still giving out food twice a month for veterans, but it is taking all of the recommended precautions.

The church is sanitized regularly, and volunteers wear gloves and minimize contact between

themselves and those picking up the food items. Theyre also limiting the number of people who come into the church to two at a time, he said.

Once inside, a volunteer, wearing a mask, checks the person in, and another volunteer signs the register for them. The veterans point out which items they want and a volunteer, again wearing gloves, places the items in a bag.

Turner said everything is conducted within Centers for Disease Control guidelines. Were complying with what the feds are telling us to do and practicing social distancing, he said.

PVACs Pete Meletis said the feeding programs are vital for the veterans who need them and thats why every effort will be made to make sure they continue. He said PVAC is donating money to the various sites to enable them to buy food.

Turner said he picked up about 3,000 pounds of food Thursday.

Were in operation and continuing to feed, Meletis said.

Meletis said those involved in making sure these veterans dont go hungry are committed to making sure that doesnt happen.

This is Gods work were doing, he said.

While most nutritional needs are being met, Hedley said he hopes the veterans who look to Richards for companionship and a social life will be able to weather this crisis.

I really feel bad for a lot of these veterans that (are) almost dependent on this comradery, he said.

I feel terrible. I wish I could reach out to these folks.

The feeding program and food locations for veterans are as follows:

FeedNC, 275 S. Broad St., Mooresville, providing take-home meals on the first and third Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to noon.

Rocky Mount United Methodist Church, 1739 Perth Road, Mooresville; second and fourth Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

First Church of the Nazarene, 506 Medlin St., Statesville; first and third Thursdays, 4-7 p.m.

Union Grove United Methodist Church, 1331 Sloans Mill Road, Union Grove; second and fourth Thursdays, 4-6:30 p.m.

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Veterans lose social outlet with closing but efforts to provide nutrition still ongoing - Statesville Record & Landmark

Dont Overdo the Coronavirus Stockpiling – The New York Times

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Grocery store shelves have been cleaned out, despite the fact that there is currently no lack of food in the country. Although the empty shelves may look worrisome, there is no need to grab that last box of keto pea protein linguine if its not something you already eat.

Panic-buying every jar of pasta sauce in the store may also affect those who dont have the means or the space to stockpile, in particular people who dont have the financial ability to spend hundreds of dollars on groceries at once. That is probably about half of us, especially during this time when many of us are not working or cant work, with limited incomes or no incomes coming in, said Lorrene Ritchie, director of the Nutrition Policy Institute at the University of California. The last thing a family in that situation can do is go out and spend $500 on groceries.

Here are tips on how to shop for food responsibly, without overstocking your bunker.

Its scary to see your local grocery store completely emptied of supplies, but fight the urge to panic by looking at what has happened in other places. Although there have been reports of food shortages in Wuhan, China, one of the first cities to be locked down, grocery stores remain open in Italy, France, and California, where people are being asked to shelter in place.

Though bare shelves may make food feel scarce, remind yourself that this shortage is temporary. Before you buy your 20th can of beans, consider the person behind you who can buy only a little at a time, whether because of financial or space constraints. I think this is a rare situation where were going to have to walk into the store and say, Do I need this more than the next person who might be coming down this aisle? said Nathan Novemsky, professor of marketing and psychology at Yale University.

Food assistance programs, such as the Special Supplemental Nutritional Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), allow participants to buy only items that are eligible, so by avoiding those things, youll be helping people in your community who have limited choices.

Presuming you get sick and all your familys going to be quarantined, then only that amount of food is what you need, and any more than that is probably going to end up being wasted, said Dr. Ritchie. The C.D.C. currently recommends having a two-week supply of food and knowing how to get food delivered, if thats possible where you live.

And hold on tight to that advice, because the desire to overbuy may actually increase over the next few weeks. The psychological panic buying is in its infancy compared to where its going to reach when people start to feel the effects of the virus around them, said Dr. Novemsky.

Dig through the back of your pantry and the corners of your freezer how many half-full bags of pasta and frozen broccoli do you have? If youre going to be stuck at home with more time on your hands, this is a good moment to experiment.

Cooking with constraints is how some of the worlds best dishes were created, said Tamar Adler, host of the Food Actually podcast on Luminary and author of An Everlasting Meal: Cooking With Economy and Grace. Some of the most delicious things seem to be created by having to make food out of what is left, she said in a phone interview, citing now-fancy dishes that use ingredients that would have been thrown away, like bouillabaisse (a French seafood soup) and ribollita (an Italian soup that uses up stale bread and beans). Anybody can make something taste good when they have top-shelf ingredients at their disposal. But Ms. Adler praises being able to make the best of stuff that is often ignored, like the stale bread and bones, and this is the perfect time to be doing that.

She recommends being flexible with substitutes, mixing different dried grains into savory porridge or making pastry dough out of whatever flour or fat you have on hand. Im looking at my half-empty jars of jam, and so Im going to try to make hand pies, she says.

New York Times Cooking has plenty of pantry recipes that can be made with the staples you probably already have at home. If you do have time to make it out to the store and your store is stocked heres what you should buy.

Even though a food shortage may not be real, a volunteer-labor shortage and an influx of newly unemployed people have caused problems at food distribution organizations. Organizations often have annual fund-raisers, which may be canceled or postponed as people practice social distancing. Consider donating generously to food banks and other charities this year if you are able. (Wirecutter has more ways you can help your community while keeping everyone healthy.)

If you arent in a position to donate money, you can also donate time safely. The food banks, your local food pantry, are experiencing shortages of people to work and put packages of food together. Often that can happen in a safe way with social distancing, Dr. Ritchie said.

Sign up for the Wirecutter Weekly Newsletter and get our latest recommendations every Sunday.

A version of this article appears at Wirecutter.com.

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Beating cabin fever: Focus on nutrition, exercise, enough sleep – Alton Telegraph

Posted: at 10:44 pm


Beating cabin fever: Focus on nutrition, exercise, enough sleep

ALTON Spring is right around the corner, and many have a bad case of cabin fever both mentally and physically but thats a trade off for possible exposure to novel coronavirus and a bad case of COVID-19 disease.

We know that many people experience stress and anxiety when there is a crisis, Centerstones Becky Stoll, vice president of the mental health and counseling facilitys Crisis and Disaster Management.

If you, or someone you know, are showing signs of stress or anxiety, there a few things you can do.

One way to reduce stress and anxiety is to limit how much time spent reading or watching news about the crisis.

This will give you more time to focus on keeping yourself healthy, which you can do by exercising, eating the right foods and getting enough sleep.

Stoll noted that everyone reacts to stressful situations in different ways. Some people might need to talk with a professional to help them cope.

And that is perfectly OK, she said.

At Centerstone, our clinicians are here to help anyone who may be experiencing stress, anxiety, depression or another mental health condition, and we will continue to provide these services during the current crisis.

And, just because youre staying home, it doesnt mean you cant stay active.

Exercise doesnt have to be at a gym, on equipment or lifting weights or treadmills, said OSF HealthCares Matt Janus, an exercise physiologist at OSF HealthCare systems Saint James-John W. Albrecht Medical Center in Pontiac.

Its just whatever gets your body moving, that you enjoy and can stick with.

The American Heart Association, for basic heart health, recommends 150 minutes of exercise during the course of one week. Often in winter months motivation to stay active wanes, but people are longing to again get active come spring. Janus explained that the 150 minutes of exercise can be broken down into small increments.

Really, if you are doing anything in the house that gets your body moving for ten minutes and gets your breathing up a little bit, your heart rate up, its going to help, he said.

So things, like, doing more activity intensive chores, such as vacuuming or sweeping or taking your stairs for a few minutes at a time, up and down all add up. It might seem silly, but it all goes toward the goal.

Janus also recommended keeping things simple because intense exercise isnt necessarily what is needed for which to strive. Even a living room dance party counts, he said. And there are plenty of virtual dance parties online, especially at Facebook. Many are live, in which participants can see each other for virtual social interaction, but a live party is optional. Those who tune in to social media can choose to simply hear the music to which to dance.

Even if youre just dancing with your kids for a half hour, that can give you just as much benefit as doing a ten minute high-intensity workout, Janus said.

It doesnt have to be all or nothing when it comes to exercise, he explained. Something is better than nothing. Whatever you can do, that you enjoy, to get your body moving is going to be the best for you.

Call OSF Saint Anthonys Medical Center at 618-465-2571 and ask to be connected to its Wellness Services to talk to a specialist who can help plan a path to wellness that fits individual needs. In line with mental health recommendations of keeping healthy eating habits, especially during stressful and anxious situations, OSF Saint Anthonys registered dietitians also can help individuals develop those habits. Visit http://www.osfhealthcare.org for more information.

Call Centerstone, 2615 Edwards St., Alton, at 618-462-2331 or visit http://www.centerstone.org for more information.

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Fruit Street Health and Purple Carrot Announce Exclusive Partnership to Provide Plant-Based Meals and Nutrition Advice Via Telehealth – Yahoo Finance

Posted: at 10:43 pm


Families can prepare meals together and participate in a healthy lifestyle program at home through live video conferencing with Registered Dietitians

Industry-first partnership also highlights the benefit of a holistic approach to reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes

NEW YORK, March 31, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --Fruit Street Health, the only diabetes prevention program (DPP) offered through live group video conferencing with Registered Dietitians (RDs), and Purple Carrot, the first 100% plant-based meal kit company, announced an exclusive partnership to provide dietitian-approved, plant-based meals to Fruit Street participants. Additionally, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and to enable more people to take advantage of this offering, Fruit Street is now allowing anyone - from low-risk individuals to people with type 2 diabetes - to sign up for its healthy lifestyle/DPP program at a reduced cost.To learn more, visit https://www.fruitstreet.com/purple-carrot/.

"With more Americans practicing social distancing and staying home with their families during the COVID-19 pandemic, we wanted to increase access to healthy meals and nutrition advice through our telehealth platform and partnership with Purple Carrot," said Laurence Girard, founder and CEO of Fruit Street. "We have a team of more than 1,000 Registered Dietitians ready to help people eat healthy and stay active during this unprecedented shift in our daily routines."

As part of Fruit Street's lifestyle coaching, RDs teach participants how to adopt a 'food as medicine' mindset by focusing on the macronutrients, specifically the amount of carbs and sugars their participants are consuming each day. Fruit Street's RDs reviewed and verified that the Purple Carrot meals adhere to the dietary guidelines that Fruit Street participants are encouraged to follow in order to lose weight and reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes. Participants can then use the Fruit Street app to take pictures of the Purple Carrot meals they have cooked at home and receive encouragement from their dietitian and other group members.

"So many chronic health conditions can be addressed through food, and we've seen dramatic improvement in our customers' lives who have incorporated plant-based meals into their routine," said Andy Levitt, founder and CEO of Purple Carrot. "By partnering with Fruit Street's diabetes prevention program, we can extend the impact of a plant-based diet to help people reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes."

Fruit Street will be the first digital diabetes prevention program to partner with a plant-based meal delivery service as part of its holistic approach to improving health outcomes for people with, or at risk for, prediabetes. Fruit Street's comprehensive DPP program offers participants personalized attention and unlimited messaging with Registered Dietitians (RDs), a free wireless scale and Fitbit Inspire Activity Tracker to track their progress, and now a plant-based meal delivery service to help build healthy eating habits (for an additional fee).

Fruit Street's program is now being offered for only $19.99/month to anyone who wants to follow a healthy lifestyle routine, including individuals with type 2 diabetes and those who are considered low-risk for developing type 2 diabetes. In addition, participants can also use a Healthcare Savings Account (HSA) or Flexible Spending Account (FSA) to cover the cost of the program. Purple Carrot subscriptions start at $72 a week. To sign up, visit https://www.fruitstreet.com/purple-carrot/

For more information about Fruit Street Health, visit http://www.fruitstreet.com. For more information about Purple Carrot, visit http://www.purplecarrot.com.

About Fruit StreetFruit Street (www.FruitStreet.com) is a physician-funded telehealth startup that offers the only online diabetes prevention program (DPP) fully-recognized by the CDC that is delivered via HIPAA-compliant live group video chat. Fruit Street's program is proven to help people lose at least 5-7% of their body weight which can reverse the progression of disease, reduce personal health care costs and reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes and other chronic conditions. Fruit Street takes a more holistic approach to diabetes prevention, offering people a comprehensive lifestyle modification curriculum which includes personalized attention and unlimited messaging with Registered Dietitians (RDs), a plant-based meal delivery service through a partnership with Purple Carrot, and a free wireless scale and Fitbit Inspire Activity Tracker to track their progress. Founded in 2014 as a public benefit corporation, Fruit Street has raised more than $17 million in capital from hundreds of physicians who are dedicated to making a lasting social impact in healthcare.

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Study finds ‘smart’ devices effective in reducing adverse outcomes of heart condition – Science Codex

Posted: at 10:43 pm


A new study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, highlights the feasible use of mobile health (mHealth) devices to help with the screening and detection of a common heart condition.

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heart rhythm condition that causes an irregular and sometimes, abnormally fast heart rate. In AF, the heart's upper chambers (atria) contract randomly and sometimes so fast that the heart muscle cannot relax properly between contractions. This reduces the heart's efficiency and performance - but also leads to a higher risk of blood clots.

AF is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, affecting around one million people in the UK. People with AF are at increased risk of having a stroke and dying, as well as heart failure and dementia. Currently, low detection due to lack of visible symptoms and non-adherence are major problems in current management approaches for patients with suspected AF.

Photoplethysmography technology

mHealth devices, such as fitness trackers, smart watches and mobile phones, may enable earlier AF detection, and improved AF management through the use of photoplethysmography (PPG) technology.

PPG is a simple and low-cost optical technique that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. It is often used non-invasively to make measurements at the skin surface.

To help determine whether a mHealth technology-supported AF integrated management strategy would reduce AF-related adverse events, compared to usual care, an international team of researchers, led by Associate Professor Guo from Chinese PLA General Hospital in Beijing, and Professor Gregory Lip, Lead for the Liverpool Centre for Cardiovascular Science (LCCC)/Price-Evans Chair of Cardiovascular Medicine at University of Liverpool, conducted a randomised trial.

Central to the study was mobile health technologies developed by leading global technology companies, with a focus on using wearable smart devices such as those from Huawei, working in conjunction with a specially developed mobile app. These pieces of equipment and software can monitor a person's vital signs with great detail and, most importantly for this study, 24 hours a day.

The specially designed mobile app not only charted the patient's biometrics, it afforded clinicians the ability to offer integrated care throughout the duration of the trial. Doctors were able to periodically assess the patient's updated statistics and contact them through the app to offer advice via the ABC care pathway. The ABC pathway, developed in part by the LCCS' Professor Gregory Lip, is a set of guidance for patients and clinicians, which aims to promote a streamlined holistic approach to the management of AF, and ensure that the danger of complications is minimised.

The researchers enrolled a cluster of 3,324 AF patients aged over 18 years from 40 cities across China. The patients were randomized with 1678 receiving usual care and 1646 receiving integrated care based on a mobile AF Application (mAFA) incorporating the ABC Pathway: 'A' Avoid stroke; 'B' Better symptom management; 'C' Cardiovascular and other comorbidity risk reduction. All patients were followed up in outpatient clinics at 6 and 12 months.

Results

Upon completion of the study, the researchers were able to show that occurrences of stroke, systemic thromboembolism, death and rehospitalisation were significantly lower with those patients in the mHealth intervention group compared to those undergoing usual care (1.9% compared with 6%). Rehospitalisation rates were also notably reduced, with only 1.2% of patients in the intervention group needing to be readmitted to hospital, in comparison to 4.5% of patients in the control group.

In addition to these positive figures, subgroup analyses by gender, age, type of condition, risk score and comorbidities, demonstrated consistently lower risks for the composite outcome for patients receiving the mAFA intervention compared to usual care.

These results show an undeniable benefit for the adoption of an integrated approach to monitoring and treating cardiac conditions such as AF.

With smart technologies such as phones, watches and integrated smart home systems becoming increasingly accessible and affordable, the ability for clinicians and researchers to adopt this technology to passively and unobtrusively gather a seemingly unlimited amount of data and information on the global health population is offering boundless opportunity for assessing and treating all manner of diseases and conditions.

Integrated care approach

Associate Professor Guo said: "Our study clearly highlights the need for an integrated care approach to holistic AF care, supported by mobile health technology, as it help to reduce the risks of rehospitalisation and clinical adverse events."

Professor Lip said: "Improved AF care requires early detection which enables the implementation of the priorities of AF management, which is as 'easy as ABC': Avoid stroke; Better symptom optimisation; Cardiovascular and risk factor management. Our clinical trial shows how the mAFA App and smart devices can improve detection of AF and the holistic management of AF patients, improving outcomes in this common heart rhythm disorder."

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Study finds 'smart' devices effective in reducing adverse outcomes of heart condition - Science Codex

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